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http://mammouth.tuxfamily.org/slackware/desktop.jpg


I found this pic when I searched "slackware" on google images, seeing as I am looking into installing Slackware 11 over my RedHat 9 Install.

In the above picture, is that the default theme for slackware (with the dock and the transparent windows)? It makes it look like Mac OS X (in a way), and with the way Linux functions, and the way OS X looks, that would make a killer team on my computer (seeing as I can't afford a damn $1,500 Macbook from apple.com).

Another question:
Is Slackware 11 equiped with better sound drivers than RedHat 9 has? Because with my RedHat 9 box now, I can't listen to music or videos, seeing as I don't know where to find what sound card I have.

Also:
In the Slackware desk on the image's computer, he has little "widget" things on the upper-right-hand corner of it. Is that standard, or are all of these things just add-ins that can be installed on any linux distro?

If this belongs in "Getting Started and Choosing a Distro," then, moderators, feel free to move it, just don't get mad at me. I thought it might go here because my main question was about the dock and the transparancy in the Slackware image.

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Last Post by John A
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In the above picture, is that the default theme for slackware (with the dock and the transparent windows)? It makes it look like Mac OS X (in a way), and with the way Linux functions, and the way OS X looks, that would make a killer team on my computer

My guess is that it's Gnome, running SuperKaramba, and probably some sort of SuperKaramba plugin like TuxBar for the dock. I suspect the transparency is some sort of Gnome Theme. And no, I don't think it's the default theme for Slackware, although I could be wrong as I've not tried Slackware 11 yet.

Is Slackware 11 equiped with better sound drivers than RedHat 9 has? Because with my RedHat 9 box now, I can't listen to music or videos, seeing as I don't know where to find what sound card I have.

I'm not completely sure about that one, in any case you can always download the drivers using Google. To find the soundcard that you have, you can either boot into Windows if you have it installed, and look under the System control panel. In the devices tab, look for any data related to your soundcard.

If you don't have Windows installed, you can also try taking apart the computer and looking at the label on the sound card.

In the Slackware desk on the image's computer, he has little "widget" things on the upper-right-hand corner of it. Is that standard, or are all of these things just add-ins that can be installed on any linux distro?

I doubt they're standard, but I highly suspect that they too are SuperKaramba plugins.

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desktop: Im going with KDE, since the command in the shell is ksnapshot. I think superKaramba is a tool for making widgets for the KDE env and not gnome.

sound drivers: joe's right, google or your distro. Since Linux is open source everyone pretty much shares the specific drivers if they dont already come as part of the kernel base. Have you tried ALSA as a module? You need to sniff around and figure out the exact card, dmesg and lspci are great tools.

widgets: prolly custom made or a very slick skin to a KDE tool.

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desktop: Im going with KDE, since the command in the shell is ksnapshot. I think superKaramba is a tool for making widgets for the KDE env and not gnome.

Ah yes, I missed somehow missed that important detail (also the fact that they're using Konsole is another big hint). However, it's not to say you couldn't create a Gnome enviroment that looks identical or very similar to the one displayed here.

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