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I use Cisco VPN Client software on Windows XP to access a client's remote network. However, they force me to use their proxy server to access the Internet. I only use one system on the remote network, but I don't want the rest of my traffic going through the VPN, because it's slow.

Is there a way to modify the routing tables after connecting to the VPN so that I can have access to the sole system through the VPN, but have the remainder of my Internet access still use my own local connection?

I've tried adding routes to the routing table, i.e. > route add [addressOfRemoteSystem] mask 255.255.255.255 [addressOfNextHop] This "works" (more accurately, this route addition doesn't break anything.)

However, the default gateway is still on the VPN. If I change the default gateway to use my local router: > route change 0.0.0.0 mask 0.0.0.0 192.168.2.2 then all network access breaks until I disconnect from the VPN, thus resetting the routing table to the way it was before connecting to the VPN.

Any ideas?

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Last Post by choybutchoy
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Although this is not exactly what I wanted, I did find this (http://www.anitkb.com/2011/07/enable-and-disable-proxy-settings.html) post to be interesting, so that I could at least enable the proxy server upon connection, and disable it afterward, using a connection script with the VPN client.

The basic idea of the post is to use the registry to enable and disable proxies. One may create a .REG file like so:

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Internet Settings]
"ProxyEnable"=dword:00000000

According to the original author of the article, "The value of '00000000' disables this setting while the value of '00000001' enables the setting." One may then automate the registry changes in a batch file by using:

regedit /s "path to file"

If anyone has an idea on how to route traffic, though, that would be ideal!

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So is your problem solved?

No, unfortunately, not yet.

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Well i think you should create an ACL, i know how to do on a Cisco router, not in a VPN client, google to find out how to do that, i take a look an d i will let you know if i find something usefull.

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Well i think you should create an ACL, i know how to do on a Cisco router, not in a VPN client, google to find out how to do that, i take a look an d i will let you know if i find something usefull.

Also take a look to your wireless router, if there you can apply an ACL, or consider to apply the DD-WRT firmware on it, it allows you to make a lot of things with your router, other solution is to use an old CPU and install a Linux distro such as IPCop, monowall, zential to do this task more efectivelly, this if you want to make your connection from home or office, but if you want to do this from anywhere in your laptop, try using the netsh commands from the Windows CLI.

Sorry for replying my own reply.

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