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What is a telnet password and is it automatically type 7? If not how do I make the telnet password a type 7? Pls help I am confused with it. Thanks

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Last Post by king03
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Huh? I don't know what you are talking about, unless you are referring to 7-bit ASCII key codes, which would make sense. I have done complete telnet implementations for real-time operating systems (both client and server side, device drivers, and all the rest of it) back in the early 1990's. According to the DDN Protocol Handbook, the official source repository for all TCP/IP specifications, in the telnet section (RFC 854, Volume 2, page 575) it says this:

Page 5-578: Although a TELNET connection through the network is intrinsically full duplex, the NVT (Network Virtual Terminal) is to be viewed as a half-duplex device operating in a line-buffered mode. That is, unless and until options are negotiated to the contrary.

Nowhere do I find anything that limits it to 7-bits, although that may be implied in that a telnet session can be ascii (7 bits) or binary (8 bits), and that can be negotiated (RFC 856, pages 2-595-598, Telnet Binary Transmission). I think that from what you seem to be saying is that the router expects a telnet connection stream to be non-binary (ascii) only, so you need to set your terminal emulator / telnet client to run in that mode (7-bits / character).

Finally, the entire telnet spec is almost 165 pages in length, and these are 8 1/2 x 11 typewritten pages. :-) FWIW, a telnet client will be able to negotiate all of this when it connects to the server (router in your case), unless Cisco left the negotiation protocol out of their software for binary/non-binary support, which would be a MAJOR violation of the standard and specifications. At worst it should at least tell the client that it must not transmit binary data. The default setting for the binary data transmission capability is OFF (WON'T TRANSMIT-BINARY / DON'T TRANSMIT-BINARY).

Edited by rubberman: n/a

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Huh? I don't know what you are talking about, unless you are referring to 7-bit ASCII key codes, which would make sense. I have done complete telnet implementations for real-time operating systems (both client and server side, device drivers, and all the rest of it) back in the early 1990's. According to the DDN Protocol Handbook, the official source repository for all TCP/IP specifications, in the telnet section (RFC 854, Volume 2, page 575) it says this:

Page 5-578: Although a TELNET connection through the network is intrinsically full duplex, the NVT (Network Virtual Terminal) is to be viewed as a half-duplex device operating in a line-buffered mode. That is, unless and until options are negotiated to the contrary.

Nowhere do I find anything that limits it to 7-bits, although that may be implied in that a telnet session can be ascii (7 bits) or binary (8 bits), and that can be negotiated (RFC 856, pages 2-595-598, Telnet Binary Transmission). I think that from what you seem to be saying is that the router expects a telnet connection stream to be non-binary (ascii) only, so you need to set your terminal emulator / telnet client to run in that mode (7-bits / character).

Finally, the entire telnet spec is almost 165 pages in length, and these are 8 1/2 x 11 typewritten pages. :-) FWIW, a telnet client will be able to negotiate all of this when it connects to the server (router in your case), unless Cisco left the negotiation protocol out of their software for binary/non-binary support, which would be a MAJOR violation of the standard and specifications. At worst it should at least tell the client that it must not transmit binary data. The default setting for the binary data transmission capability is OFF (WON'T TRANSMIT-BINARY / DON'T TRANSMIT-BINARY).

How do I put password in packet tracer? and also what is a AMY and AU router?? Here is the complete instructions our prof gave us when he left for a meeting. Also how do you make it max of 2 users at a time for remote access? Boss please explain me how to do those lines in red only. I've also provided a snapshot of my network for an easy reference. Need your expert's advice sir. Thank you very much!


IP BLOCK: 172.201.56.75 / 14

DTE, END DEVICE - FIRST USABLE

DCE, ROUTER LAN - LAST USABLE

BANNER: "KEEP OUT"

CLOCK RATE: 64000

PASSWORD: (TELNET, CONSOLE): CISCO <-- TYPE7

ENABLE PASSWORD: CISCO --> SECRET M05

MAX. 2 USERS AT A TIME FOR REMOTE ACCESS

AMY TO AU ROUTER

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