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Hello,
I have a local domain server, managed via a Windows Server 2003 R2 SE machine, and would like to be able to broadcast messages as an administrator to all client PCs which are connected to the domain, whereby the message will just pop-up on the users' screens, and either an OK button appearing or it automatically times out. e.g. 60 seconds, and closes by itself.

However, in doing so, no additional software should be installed on the client PCs to receive the broadcast, as the internal policy is to strictly prevent "chat-communication" between users using third-party software.

Any way of going ahead to implement this?

Thanks.

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Last Post by cguan_77
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I'd like to see how too given this feature was removed from all Windows years ago (maybe a decade.) The reason was it was exploited and that exploit is now closed.

I know you want to do this but since your target OS no longer does this out of the box, you may be left wanting.

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You should be able to write a low-level C/C++ tool to do this that you can call from a script. You will probably need to configure your routers to keep the broadcasts inside your LAN or specific sub-nets, otherwise the world will see your casts. Some of our engineers back about 15 years ago misconfigured some TIB software to use broadcasts and it shut down our entire corporate network (too many too fast). The powers that be were not happy! I had to clean up their mess!

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If you have a Windows 7 or later workstation you can use PowerShell, because Win 2003 I think it doesn't support PowerShell if it does it might be limited.

A workstation can do as long as PowerShell command line or PowerShell ISE is installed.
Of course, you need to run the PowerShell in an elevated mode ( run it with domain admin rights).

Check out link below it might give you some idea on what you're trying to achieve.
http://quickbytesstuff.blogspot.sg/2014/05/how-to-show-remote-notifications-in.html

Good luck! Cheers!

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