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I don't know whether this is the right section to post, please help to move to a proper section if it is a wrong section. Thanks.

I built up a RSI (repetitive strain injury) in my index and middle fingers due to excessive mousing last year. I tried many methods to cure it but it just didn't go away.

At first, I thought it was the mouse too cheap, so I replaced a better mouse, after a fews month, I've switched to different mouse back and forth, finally I did a little research on the internet and found that I developed an injury for my fingers.

Then I visited a practitioner, he said it is very common problem he've seen and the ultimate advice of his would be to quit programming. He gave mem some vitamin pills, anti-inflammatory pill drugs and gel. I ate the pills and used the gel, it didn't help much.

Then I switched from mouse to touchpad in my office to avoid mousing, it get better.

But back in my home I am still using mouse for my desktop computer usage, I already quited gaming. Maybe I should look for alternatives for mouse. I don't know if a trackball is suitable.

I soak my fingers in ice water, it help a little too.

Overall my RSI problem haven't been cured by now. Do you have any experience in such type of injury due to excessive mousing?

Edited by gunbuster363: n/a

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Last Post by jwenting
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Depending on the exact nature of the complaints (if they're caused by clicking buttons or by your hand position) switching to a pen tablet may help a lot. I use a Wacom Bamboo now at work, which has pretty much ended the chronic pain I used to get in my wrists.
At home I still use a mouse, but I use a carefully selected model that gives maximum support to the hand (so not one of those mini-rodents that are so popular these days).
Trackball might work too in that case as it also provides more support for your hand than do most mice, but for me at least I could never get used to one.

If it's because of overpressure when clicking buttons on the mouse, you never get relief from that as you also put pressure on them when typing using a keyboard and indeed the only way to prevent it getting worse (and maybe in time get it to heal at least in part) is to stop using computers completely for several months to years (and that include touch screens on phones, tablets, etc.).

Another thing to consider is buying an ergonomic keyboard.
Switching to a Goldtouch GTN077 at work (where I do most typing) and Microsoft LS4000 at home (which is cheaper, the Goldtouch costs several hundred dollars) pretty much cured the beginning RSI symptoms in my shoulders by changing my posture and hand positioning to minimise stress on the upper arms and shoulders.
Getting desk and chair correctly set up by an ergonomics expert also helps (use those armrests, correct leg and foot angles, back support, screen position, etc. etc. all help).

Your boss should be responsible for those things, at least at work (and once set up there you can work to replicate the settings at home).
Not doing so is irresponsible as he's generating an employee who's on long term disability leave, which is in the end way more expensive.

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