Hello there, I am an affiliate marketer can you please let me know how can i get quality traffic.
please help me.

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Are you spending your time making the best product you can or are you yet another reseller of plastic?

Rproffitt, he specified he’s an affiliate marketer. That means he doesn’t produce any product. He resells products sold by another company. You also mention that he should have a …

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Regarding being a non-producer. There's a biblical reference I could offer here but if they dont' add value then they are often relegated to being treated like the money changers in the temples.

Another view is from Benny Hill if we want a more comedic angle which is "cut out …

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Let me put it a different way ...

And do they offer added value?

The value that they bring is by bringing business to the eCommerce store. In return, the eCommerce store pays them a commission for any business they bring in.

If not, not much if …

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I must say that not much has changed since that was last asked. But as to the mobile app I see folk have tired of installing an app specific to a company. My advice is to make sure your web site is mobile friendly.

Finally, what good is that traffic without sales? Are you spending your time making the best product you can or are you yet another reseller of plastic?

commented: Not relevant to his question. -8

Are you spending your time making the best product you can or are you yet another reseller of plastic?

Rproffitt, he specified he’s an affiliate marketer. That means he doesn’t produce any product. He resells products sold by another company. You also mention that he should have a mobile friendly website. Not all, but most, affiliate marketers don’t have websites of their own. They promote the eCommerce store of the company they’re affiliated with.

Maseru, in terms of answering your question, focus on promoting individual products to the most targeted audience. If I recall correctly, Google made it harder last year to bid on PPC for affiliate products. What about Facebook ads? Start a blog for each product line, or partner with existing blogs.

I used to attend the annual Affiliate Summit NYC conference every year. Nowadays, in a Covid world, perhaps the conference has gone virtual and it’s possible to attend?

Good luck!

Regarding being a non-producer. There's a biblical reference I could offer here but if they dont' add value then they are often relegated to being treated like the money changers in the temples.

Another view is from Benny Hill if we want a more comedic angle which is "cut out the middle man." If we are buying from a reseller, then we are paying a middleman and all too often going to be added to some email spam list.

To mfasetu, what value are you adding?

Rproffitt, affiliate marketing is an enormous industry. If an affiliate marketer posts a question in our marketing forums, it’s not the place, nor appropriate, to respond to them by bashing their industry, asking them to defend their career choice to you, and pretty much tell them they shouldn’t be doing it in the first place.

Insinuating he doesn’t add value is rather insulting and has nothing to do with the question he asked.

Yes, affiliate marketers are middlemen. That doesn’t mean that there isn’t a need. I wouldn’t have been able to buy my house without real estate brokers. I wouldn’t have been able to find a mortgage with the lowest interest rates without a mortgage broker.

Suppose I am an e-commerce store that sells a product. I spend all my time and energy working on operations to build the e-commerce site, partner with wholesalers, ship the products, etc. I don’t have the means to bring my site to mass market or get the products I sell in front of potential buyers. Instead, I affiliate myself with marketers to be my foot soldiers and promote my products across all sorts of different channels and get my pitch into the hands of the people most likely to buy. Just about every big retail company in existence survives on the backs of millions of affiliate marketers. They’re the foot soldiers of e-commerce, and Amazon, for one, would not exist AT ALL without them. Amazon famously relied almost exclusively on affiliate marketing to launch its popularity back in the 90s.

Also, per your latest post, affiliate marketers do not charge you more and keep the difference. They aren’t middlemen in that regard. They don’t have their own websites where they sell products at a premium. Instead, they advertise the e-commerce stores where you can buy the products directly from the source. The industry connects buyers with sellers, and the sellers give them a commission for referring buyers to them. Essentially, they are commission based sales people.

It’s an industry focused around promoting e-commerce, and e-commerce sites, specifically Amazon and eBay, would not exist at all if it weren’t for this industry. They really are the foot soldiers meant to be celebrated, not insulted.

Folk I know think of them as cannon fodder and while it's an industry, is it a good industry?

Can you do this and pay your rent, buy a home, send your kids to college or does your income evaporate with a change by Google, Amazon, Facebook, etc?

And do they offer added value? Do they help you configure the widget, wongle, or whatever it is? If not, not much if any value to me.

Folk I know think of them as cannon fodder and while it's an industry, is it a good industry?

People shouldn't judge things they don't understand.

Can you do this and pay your rent, buy a home, send your kids to college or does your income evaporate with a change by Google, Amazon, Facebook, etc?

Of course!!!!! It's a multi-billion dollar industry. However, as with anyone with a career in sales that is very heavily commission-dependant, it depends on what it is you're selling, and how good of a salesperson you are. A used car salesperson selling used cars is not going to make the same commissions as a car salesperson at a Tesla dealership. The better the salesperson you are, and the more you prove you can close sales, the more opportunities open up to work with bigger ticket items. By that same point, however, the used car salespeson might be selling 2 cheap cars a day, while the Tesla salesperson might be selling 1 expensive car a week. At the end of the day, the take-home commissions might work out similarly.

An entrepreneur who does affiliate marketing as a side hobby can earn one or two thousand a month. An entrepreneur who does affiliate marketing fulltime can earn $10K or $20K a month, with the higher end of that being if they started an affiliate marketing business with hired employees. Someone who has a salaried job doing affiliate marketing for a mid-sized business can typically earn a salary from $40K up to $90K per year, depending on where they live and adjusting for cost of living. Someone with a salaried job doing affiliate marketing for a public company might be higher than that.

And do they offer added value? Do they help you configure the widget, wongle, or whatever it is? If not, not much if any value to me.

What do you mean by do they help you configure the widget? No, that's not their job. Doing that wouldn't make sense. It's a marketing-based position. That's like saying that it would be my job to help people with products they buy as a result of clicking ads on DaniWeb. The job of affiliate marketers is to team up with businesses that sell products (e.g. affiliate themselves with them), and then make a deal with the business owners that they will get them leads and potential customers, in exchange for commission on anything that the people they refer buy.

And do they offer added value?

Well, Amazon and eBay both wouldn't exist today without affiliate marketers being foot soldiers promoting all their products. Literally affiliate marketing was Amazon's prime business model for its first ten years. Good affiliate marketers, just like any good commision-based salespeople, know their product and are better at selling it.

Just recently I went to a mattress store to buy a mattress. The salesperson was pushy but didn't really know the product very well. Lucky for him, we knew what we wanted and he ended up getting the commission anyways.

The point I'm trying to make is, just as if with any commission-based sales position, affiliate marketers who know their product well, know who to pitch it to, and have a good pitch, will make more commissions than affiliate marketers who just push the product without really doing a good job selling you on why you need it.

That's why in my response to the OP, I suggested that the either start a blog, or partner with blogs, to get more information out there about the product he's selling. People feel more comfortable when they feel they're buying from informed salespeople.

However, it's also absolutely the case that some products just completely speak for themselves. Suppose I'm an affiliate marketer for USB cables. If the affiliate marketer is able to get himself in front of people who already know they're in need of buying this type of cable, they don't really need to provide any added value or service to the buyer. They earned their commission simply by being able to get the manufacturer's product in front of people in need of the product. The manufacturer's marketing budget is well-spent paying commissions to affiliate marketers. It often is more cost effective to partner with affiliates than to partner with big box retailers to get your product in front of consumers.

If not, not much if any value to me.

The world you live in today wouldn't be the same without affiliate marketers. If Amazon is of no value to you, and you could live in a world that had no commission-based salespeople, no real estate brokers, no mortgage brokers, no stockbrokers, etc. etc. etc., then I don't know what else to tell ya.

Folk I know think of them as cannon fodder and while it's an industry, is it a good industry?

That's actually quite insulting. You think of all commission-based salespeople are cannon fodder? Affiliate marketing is simply the digital equivalent of a commision-based salesperson. You can think of them exactly the same. They do the exact same thing only through different mediums. A commission-based salesperson such as a broker of some type might pound the pavement, make cold calls, go door to door, try to spread word of mouth, make business connections, network, really hustle, etc. to try to drum up business. An affiliate marketer does the exact same thing only through as many digital methods as he can think of. The more creative, the more ways of reaching potential customers. The OP's question was essentially asking what different types of creative ways are there beyond the obvious. He didn't deserve to be insulted.

Let me put it a different way ...

And do they offer added value?

The value that they bring is by bringing business to the eCommerce store. In return, the eCommerce store pays them a commission for any business they bring in.

If not, not much if any value to me.

Affiliate marketers are not meant to provide any value to you. Affiliate marketers are meant to provide value to the business that they partner with.

commented: I think that explains this very nicely. +15

Affiliate marketers are not meant to provide any value to you. Affiliate marketers are meant to provide value to the business that they partner with.

I think that explains this very nicely.

Being this is the Digital Marketing forum, in which the entire forum revolves around how businesses can touch more potential customers, then it goes without saying that everything discussed in this forum is meant to provide marketing value to businesses.

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