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Hi guys need advise on build system this what i'm thinkin purchasing please tell what u think is all compatible and would it give me a powerfull computer system Please rate 1 out 10 for a £400 budget what do u think???
check it out advise please thanks in advance

sorry heres the specs what do you think is compatible

Motherboard
Gigabyte GA-MA770T-UD3 AMD 770 Socket AM3 8 Channel Audio ATX Motherboard. (http://www.ebuyer.com/product/196403)
Processor
AMD Phenom II X6 1055T 2.8GHz 9MB Cache Socket AM3 Retail Box Processor. (http://www.ebuyer.com/product/204939)
RAM
EXTRA VALUE 4GB (2x2GB) DDR3 1333MHz Memory Kit 1.5V CL9 two sets total 8GB of each of 2BG. (http://www.ebuyer.com/product/192049)
Power UNIT
Corsair 650W TX Series PSU - 120mm Fan, 80+% Efficiency, Single +12V Rail. (http://www.ebuyer.com/product/135514)
Total cost £334.33 £50 going on a case and using my 350GB Hardrive

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Last Post by Bal
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This is a very complicated question, as any need for performance will need the PC to be tailored to the task. Are you an average user, a gamer, or an IT professional running gobs of data all day? The amount of RAM will only be recognized by a 64 bit operating system, not a 32. If your OS is 32 BIT, then 3 GB of RAM is more than you will ever use. The CPU and MOBO are really nice, I love multi-core configurable arrays. The HD may be a bottleneck for performance. In order to match the performance of the CPU/MOBO, you should go with a newer HD, with a large cache. I've seen systems take leaps into speedy-land with a simple HD upgrade. I'd recomend a 7200RPM SATA drive at minimum. The power supply is a single rail system. One overload and the entire system shuts off, and your data is GONE. Maybe look for a commercial multi-rail on sale. Nuff said, good luck.

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Actually, modern 32-bit operating systems (Linux and BSD at least) can utilize the PAE memory extensions of new CPU's, allowing an OS to utilize more than 4GB or RAM (limiting applications to 4GB). In any case, a 64-bit OS would be advisable for this hardware. The specs seem OK for me, for the price point you have indicated. My 8-core workstation cost me about $5000 USD about 3 1/2 years ago, but it was a high-end system w/ Intel mobo, 1KW power supply, 8GB RAM, dual gigabit ethernet ports, high-end nVidia graphics, dual 24" HD flat-panel monitors, 2.5TB of disc, and a removable (hot-swap) system drive w/ backup system drive and carrier.

Anyway, your specified hardware is all quality. One bit of advice is to not skimp on the CPU cooling fan/heat-sink, and make sure your case has good heat control. RAM runs hot, and then gets flaky. I had a RAM overheating problem recently, which I was able to fix by adjusting the location of the SIMMS and making sure that the system was drawing enough air flow over the memory modules. I was able to reduce the RAM temperature by about 30 degrees, which stopped the intermittent problems due to overheating. Most of the time it wasn't a problem, until I pushed the system performance, such as building a kernel, or running other memory/CPU intensive applications.

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Not sure what the milage is, between building and buying a machine these days.
For example http://www.pcworld.co.uk/gbuk/hp-pavilion-p6793uk-desktop-pc-09885837-pdt.html and http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=FS-226-OK is not too far off what you trying to build.

There can be a case (sic) made for either build or buy. If you just want a computer, buy one. There are lots for $500 USD and less these days. However, remember that the computer manufacturers/resellers are still trying to make a profit at those prices, so they will cut corners wherever they can. Yes, they get much better prices on components (drives, memory, CPU, mobos, et al), but that's not the entire picture.

Building/assembling your own has some tangible benefits, cost notwithstanding. First, you get to know what's in your system. Second, the warranties on failure-likely components (mobo, cpu, RAM, discs, power supply, etc) that you purchase directly are generally better than the 1 year most consumer systems give you. Example: Seagate and WD provide at least 3 years on drives; Kingston, Crucial, et al provide 2-5 years or better (lifetime) on RAM; etc. That can be important. I've had two Seagate drives fail on me over the past year or so. Because I purchased them directly from an authorized reseller, they were still under warranty, and as such replaced for free. Ditto with a RAM stick that was failing (overheating) after 3+ years. If it was a Dell or other system that I had not paid a lot extra for additional warranty time, then I would have been SOL. FWIW, I ALWAYS pay the extra $$ for a 3 year warranty for my laptops. That has been paid back many times over - mobo failure, drive failure, battery failure, display failure... All after the 1 year main warranty was up (except for the battery failure).

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Rubberman

It's really how and what the poster is wanting the machine for.

I have purchased new machines and changed things.

If you look at the spec's you can save a lot and I have still, returned WD, seagates drives and soo on even from OEM machines.

I have even recently dealt with a friends Dell laptop which is out of warranty from the store, but have agreed with DELL, since it less than 18months old, certain things should not fail in it, and it's not down to misuse.

Like anything, you can pay the extra money, but if you just want a working machine a ready built machine is ok. I always look at what's inside, and it's not like they are using cheap parts.

Again, many years ago it was cheaper to build your own, now their is little mileage in it.

There isn't even much difference in a Laptop these days, as you can get i5's for £499 or less and i7's £699 and soo on. The cost of a i5 or i7 as desktop is much more than Laptop.

Why a lot of people I know, have just gone with Laptop's unless they are serious gamers.

Edited by Bal: n/a

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Rubberman

It's really how and what the poster is wanting the machine for.

I have purchased new machines and changed things.

If you look at the spec's you can save a lot and I have still, returned WD, seagates drives and soo on even from OEM machines.

I have even recently dealt with a friends Dell laptop which is out of warranty from the store, but have agreed with DELL, since it less than 18months old, certain things should not fail in it, and it's not down to misuse.

Like anything, you can pay the extra money, but if you just want a working machine a ready built machine is ok. I always look at what's inside, and it's not like they are using cheap parts.

Again, many years ago it was cheaper to build your own, now their is little mileage in it.

There isn't even much difference in a Laptop these days, as you can get i5's for £499 or less and i7's £699 and soo on. The cost of a i5 or i7 as desktop is much more than Laptop.

Why a lot of people I know, have just gone with Laptop's unless they are serious gamers.

I don't disagree with any of that. I think the original poster wants to feel, at least, that they have some control over their system, making it truly theirs. I built my current workstation, saving several thousand USD that way, and I have purchased many others over the years from various makers, including IBM, HP, Dell, Gateway, and others (AT&T and Zenith back in the old days). I always felt that the ones I built to my own personal specifications were more "mine" than any I ever bought.

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Rubberman

I totally agree.

I have always had a system built for me back around the early 90s , but wasn't until mid 90s I started doing my own as I always found Sound issue's or something wrong. This was due, not knowing much about the makes of the components.

I never liked the all in one motherboards, but these day's you have little choice as PCI slots are rarer and harder to put the devices you want in the machine.

For those who are starting out with building a machine, make sure that you have the right case also as some of the more powerful graphics cards are the length of the case, hitting into the harddrive's sometimes.

macaela

Please let us know, if you are just wanting a machine to use, or are you venturing into building machines? Also what will this machine be used for?

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