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I am in a class doing a lab simulation. They are usually very straight forward. But this one, I am left hanging. So either I am really missing something or something went terribly awry. You can only go so wrong with a simulation, though. Set up a RAID 5 using 3 disks using the onboard software. When I try to reboot to Windows, I can't. It won't find Windows. What have I not set up right? Even at the end of the sim, I have done everything it has said, but it still won't boot to Windows. Any ideas?
I have already wasted too much of my too short time on this. Thank you!

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Last Post by Issabeaber
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IIRC, you can't boot to a software RAID 5 larger than 2 TB. Back in the days when I tried software RAID, Windows would only boot with Raid 1.

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I always thought with a software raid 5 you need to install the OS on one disk then use disk manager to set up the raid.

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You can install the OS on a RAID, but I generally don't recommend that unless it is a mirrored (RAID-1) configuration (for redundancy to protect from a single disc failure). As for file system/disc/array, Windows currently only supports 2 TB configurations, as does standard Linux. However, new BIOS's (EFI/UEFI and GPT MBR's) and such support larger discs and larger active file systems (zfs for example on Linux). Part of the problem is the use of 32-bit values for sizes/offsets, etc. For bigger stuff, you need to use 64-bit values. These are not trivial changes, and are a bit slow in becoming mainstream, although availability of discs from 3-5TB is forcing this issue to be resolved PDQ. These new disc MBR (master boot record) and file system types support discs/arrays/filesystems up to petabytes in size.

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i need ur help there are problem of read usb or flash or moderm in my laptop what can I do

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