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I have to move my P4 (Northwood) + Intel heatsink+fan to a new motherboard. Software issues are not a problems and the motherboard is compatible. But I am really baffled by all the discussion surrounding heatsinks. From what I gather these are the steps??

1- remove the heatsink +fan by unclipping the steel clips.

Question: How do I do this and won't the heatsink "stick" to the cpu? If so what do I do?

2- Lift cpu lever lock and then the cpu pops out.

Is the heatsink now reusable or do I have to get another one? There's all this discussion about Arctic Silver, cleaning heatsink, cleaning cpu,... that is just plain confusing. I didn't apply any thermal stuff at all when I put the P4+HSF in (it was a retail box) but I assume the HSF and the cpu must be "glued" together now.

Can I just buy a new HSF and pop it unto the P4 (without cleaning the P4 in exotic ways)?

3- Put cpu in new socket (easy for me) and then attach HSF.


Sorry to be so picky but I have this feeling that the HSF can't just come off easily and then put back on without doing something.

Any help would really be appreciated. If possible just assume I am totally clueless when it comes to the HSF and cpu together.


Would it be possible to remove the cpu+HSF without detaching the HSF from the cpu?

Thank's,

philip

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Last Post by jbennet
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I have all the same questions as this guy. So, instead of making a new thread I will just ask if someone could post the answers here!

Thanks!

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hi this is my first post..i am about to do same thing, but i have cleaned my heatsink and internal parts the computer many times.
The heat sink and fan are to separate parts, the fan is attached to the HS by 4 screws on each corner, once you remove the HS+Fan undo the screws and pull apart...then clean with cotton buds or whatever between the metal gaps, then put it all back together....
my question is do i NEED to add thermal glue or whatever when i move my CPU unto my new ( brand new) board
thanks for any help

Zeep

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I have just done this recently and the answer is: Yes, you will need to re-add thermal paste to the bottom of the heatsink before you install it on the CPU in the new motherboard.

So, this means:

1. Take out the old Heatsink and CPU
2. Clean both really well
3. Put new thermal paste on the Heatsink
4. Install the CPU into the new motherboard
5. Install the Heatsink with the new thermal paste on it onto the CPU in the new board and you should be good to go.

Hope this helps.

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hi this is my first post..i am about to do same thing, but i have cleaned my heatsink and internal parts the computer many times.
The heat sink and fan are to separate parts, the fan is attached to the HS by 4 screws on each corner, once you remove the HS+Fan undo the screws and pull apart...then clean with cotton buds or whatever between the metal gaps, then put it all back together....
my question is do i NEED to add thermal glue or whatever when i move my CPU unto my new ( brand new) board
thanks for any help

Zeep

it is recommended that you clean of both heatsinc and cpu of old past and apply new past .i use a flat blade,like one for a utility knife

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i didnt need to put thermal paste on mine. i have none on at all and i can keep my p4 northwood 2.6 overclocked to 3.8 under 60 degrees celcius during a benchmark easily. normally under 40 degrees. i wouldnt be too worried if u have a northwood they are really good in terms of heat

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i didnt need to put thermal paste on mine. i have none on at all and i can keep my p4 northwood 2.6 overclocked to 3.8 under 60 degrees celcius during a benchmark easily. normally under 40 degrees. i wouldnt be too worried if u have a northwood they are really good in terms of heat

Wtf. Your CPU should be melting right about now. My P4-HT 3ghz has a big heatsink and fan and arctic silver 5 and runs at over 70 on a good day, over 90 on a bad day

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