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Hey,

i want to put a new motherboard in my moms computer. Firstly, do I have to save any files on my hard drive?? Secondly, how do I discharge static from the motherboard? Lastly, is there anything I should know so that when I put it in I wont fry it? Thanks

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Last Post by Qwazil
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Files - generally no. They remain on hard drive, bu might get deleted/replaced by windows re-installation, but only system files, unless you FORMAT the drive prior to windows installation. (btw, re-installing windows will be necessary). So, when you do get the new mobo in, don't bother trying booting the thing up, unless it is identical to the old one. Go straight to windows installation process WITHOUT formating the drive, although, it would be nice if you could make a backup of needed files and do a clean installation (format the partition). That way you would have less junk on the HD (redundant remains of an old windows).
I must say the re-installing the windows means pretty much re-installing all of the applications your mom is currently using.

Discharging static is pretty simple. All you need to do is to ground the motherboard and GROUND YOUR SELF. That's the rule no. 1 with handling the electronic equipment bare-handed. Just grab a pipe or something, and for the motherboard, look for the (usually green/yellow striped) wire that is screwed to the casing. That would be the ground wire. Simplest thing would be to make a brief motherboard-PSU-socket in the wall connection, but don't get electrocuted. One plug in - plug out should suffice. By motherboard PSU connection, I meant just the grounding wire.

Last one..

- the first thing on your mind should be the reason old one got fried, if that's why you're replacing the mobo in the first place.
- ground, ground, ground.
- don't wear wool. It makes massive static discharges.
- avoid touching bare connectors. (CPU pins, RAM chips, PCI cards...).

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I'll repeat myself:

Look for the green/yellow (or green/white) striped wire that is screwed to the casing. That would be the ground wire. Simplest way to discharge the mobo static would be to briefly connect the motherboard (via casing) to the PSU via the ground wire and plug the mains cable to the socket in the wall. That would discharge any static from the motherboard.
But, that is not REALLY necessary. REALLY necessary thing would be for you to ground your self by touching a pipe or any conductor that is grounded. Touching that ground wire would do if the PSU is connected to the wall.

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Electrostatic discharge is one of the easiest way to kill an IC, it is not in the module, it is in you, but it is also one of the easiest to prevent. The cord from your PSU that plugs into the wall receptacle is grounded, and in turn so is the case that it is installed in. Just leave the PSU AC cord plugged in and you will have a ready made ground. Just make sure that you touch the metal of the case to discharge yourself before you handle the motherboard or any of the components on it. If your PSU has an on/off switch do turn it off as a precaution.

One of the issues that was eluded to was regarding needing to reinstall the OS. When you take a hdd that has been used with one motherboard and install it in another with a different one, more specifically a different chip set, the OS will try to recognize the new chip set and this is usually fatal in the long run.

If you are going to reuse the same CPU in this new motherboard you will need to clean off the old layer of thermal compound and reapply new compound. You will find it easier to install the CPU and RAM before you install the motherboard in the case. If you place the motherboard on a piece of thick card board this will protect it when you press on it to install the components.

Make sure that you read and understand the manual, pay close attention to the jumper and header settings.

Why are you changing the motherboard?

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You will find it easier to install the CPU and RAM before you install the motherboard in the case.

Easier, yes, but depends on the CPU cooler and casing layout.

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DCC, i am changing the motherboard with a new motherboard and cpu, to replace an older style CPU running at 400mhz. The new one is running 2.6ghz.

Alright thanks for your help with the static guarding

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It is possible that you would need a newer PSU if your has a old-style power switch that is connected to the PSU. Today's standard power switch (or button, to be precise) is connected to the motherboard instead of PSU.

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First I would find out if the HDD connector on the new MB is either a SATA or IDE. If you Current HDD and MB is an IDE and the New Motherboard is a SATA it is normally not compatible.

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If the old machine is PII, then it is IDE. All of the motherboards (old and new) have on-board IDE controller. Plus, there are SATA 2 IDE (and vice-versa) converters.

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Ok i have an issue with installing it......The ATX Power Supply Connector to the motherboard is at the right hand side and there is a 12V ATX connector and the left side...no where near each other. The atx power cable from the PSU will not reach both. This may sound confusing so I took a video.....:)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zcFku71WJoY


Thanks

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That should not be much of a problem, if the cables can reach both. Usually, the cables (including ATX and 12V ATX) are not bounded together or are bounded with disposable plastic straps. You must unbound them so that ATX cable can go one way and 12V ATX cable another way. Make sure that none of the cables are in a CPU fan's space.

BTW, you need both plugged in.

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I will unbind them....what will happen if I don't put in the 12V one??? I just want to know for kicks and giggles

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Hey DCC, The Motherboard is an ASUS P4S8X - X X Series, and the PSU is a Coolmax 80mm ATX V2.01 Power Supply V - 400.....hope that helps.....I really don't feel like tearing up the mesh that surrounds the motherboard cables, it looks really good with the mesh.

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Oh by the way.....I have an Anti-static wrist strap and every time I touch the motherboard I ground myself before and after

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I really don't feel like tearing up the mesh that surrounds the motherboard cables, it looks really good with the mesh.

You know what they say... if you want an omlet, you have to break some eggs.

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You really don't need the wrist strap, just touch the metal of the case before you handle anything with ICs, and you definitely don't need to do this afterwards.

I could get a picture of the PSU that showed the four pin connector, but if it is in the mesh with the twenty pin bundle you can carefully slit the mesh and separate the four pin connector from it and then zip tie the bundle. Or... you could just use one of the molex connectors as the motherboard gives you the option of either the square four pin connector or the straight moles four pin connector.

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"Looking cool" isn't exactly your first priority with cables. First of all, they are inside the casing, so cool or not cool doesn't matter. What is important is that they are not in the fan's blades space and that they are not pressing any capacitors. They have fragile "legs".

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Alright...I installed the new motherboard and I am trying to install windows xp onto it. So I went into the BIOS, reset all the defaults and set the first boot item to be the cd drive. It saves the changes and resatrts the computer when I get a message in the BIOS saying.

MESSAGE CONFIRMATION

The system intruded, chassis opened or tempered before. Please Check the system.

Ok so what do I do????

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Disable "chassis open" warning in you BIOS. It should be under "hardware monitoring" or "advanced BIOS settings" section.

Newer chassis have little sensor that detects if the chassis cover has been removed. That sensor should be connected to the motherboard (2 pins somewhere) and if it is disconnected or the chassis cover is opened, it sends you that warning. Since your chassis doesn't have that sensor, you must disable it.

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"Looking cool" isn't exactly your first priority with cables. First of all, they are inside the casing, so cool or not cool doesn't matter. What is important is that they are not in the fan's blades space and that they are not pressing any capacitors. They have fragile "legs".

Being cool is important to the person who knows what it looks like in there, it's called pride. As for functionality, having the cables neatly bundled does enhance the air flow even if it is minutely.

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Being cool is important to the person who knows what it looks like in there, it's called pride. As for functionality, having the cables neatly bundled does enhance the air flow even if it is minutely.

I never said that cables should be loose. They should be bundled, but in this case "cool looking" single bundle had to pay.

I know what my PC looks like inside, and only thing that's bothering me there is lack of 2nd VGA for Sli mode.

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