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I'm still a newbie, so please bear with me. I have an HP Pavilion xL946 with an AMD Athlon 1.1 GHz 200 FSB base processor. Yes, it's old, but it still works just fine, and is enough for what I need right now. (Not to mention that a new computer won't be in the cards for some time to come!)

BUT, the CPU fan is dying. (Maybe it's just off-balance, but it's still shutting down intermittantly.) I've spent time online with HP, and was told it's "obsolete," so they can't help with any replacement parts. Even two of their ASPs (Authorized Service Providers) have told me that they can't get a replacement.

I've done a little research, and know that the fan is a "Socket A type." When I look at suppliers' websites, though, they often list measurements, too. What I don't understand is that the one I've removed from the tower measures 7mm square and is 2.5mm thick. Any that I've found online list much larger measurements. Even on the diagonal, this one is only 8mm.

I'd really appreciate it if someone could explain to me:

1. How to measure this fan correctly so that I order the right size replacement.

2. If there's anything else I need to know before I order so that the fan will work with the heatsink that I already have, OR

3. Whether or not I should be looking at the heatsink/fan packages. (I don't have a clue how to remove the heatsink from the motherboard, either.)

Any help would be greatly appreciated.:lol:

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Last Post by AnnD
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1. If your computer was good yesterday, why should it be bad today? :cheesy:

2. Installing a complete new heatsink/fan system can be tricky, so I recommend

3. Buy a new 70mm fan, like these http://www.hardwarecooling.com/default.php/cat/48_79/70mm_Fan and mount it on the old heatsink. (good chance to clean it a bit) Check if your old fan has 2 or 3 wires and replace accordingly.

Be careful with your old fan now. Your old "Thunderbird" Athlon is a pretty hot one and can be fried easily without sufficient cooling.
The thermal compound between CPU and heatsink can become old and dry and should be changed every few years. So changing the whole cooler shebang would be better in the long run, but mounting a new fan is cheaper and easier for now.

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1. If your computer was good yesterday, why should it be bad today? :cheesy:

2. Installing a complete new heatsink/fan system can be tricky, so I recommend

3. Buy a new 70mm fan, like these http://www.hardwarecooling.com/default.php/cat/48_79/70mm_Fan and mount it on the old heatsink. (good chance to clean it a bit) Check if your old fan has 2 or 3 wires and replace accordingly.

Be careful with your old fan now. Your old "Thunderbird" Athlon is a pretty hot one and can be fried easily without sufficient cooling.
The thermal compound between CPU and heatsink can become old and dry and should be changed every few years. So changing the whole cooler shebang would be better in the long run, but mounting a new fan is cheaper and easier for now.

Thanks, Xpenetrator. I really appreciate your quick response. I wasted the better part of the day yesterday with HP online tech support and 2 of their ASPs, only to learn that none of them were able to help me locate a fan.

Online checking taught me that not only are they still available, but they're also quite inexpensive. MUCH better than just tossing out the PC.

Thanks for the heads-up about the "Thunderbird" running hot, too. I think I'll see if a 60X60X20 mm fan will fit instead of the original 60X60X10 mm. Maybe that will offer a little more cooling power.

Thanks again!:)

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I'll tell you what I did.

I bought AMD Athlon processor and tossed away (not really, I still have it here) the heatsink and fan, and got myself a brand new Thermaltake Golden orb II (fancy name). It is a cheap (~$30) replica of Zalman (Zalman is like Ferrari with CPU fans). Didn't even bother with the original heatsink/fan.

P.S.
It glows in the dark :lol:

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Hi, Chaky,

Thanks for the input. I appreciate it!

Actually, though, I did locate a replacement fan locally, and for $5 I'm up and running again. I think I'll assembe the next computer myself, and will use a transparent case!;)

AnnD

I'll tell you what I did.

I bought AMD Athlon processor and tossed away (not really, I still have it here) the heatsink and fan, and got myself a brand new Thermaltake Golden orb II (fancy name). It is a cheap (~$30) replica of Zalman (Zalman is like Ferrari with CPU fans). Didn't even bother with the original heatsink/fan.

P.S.
It glows in the dark :lol:

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Hi folks, You came up in my own search. I am trying to get a replacement fan for my prec.wrkstation - and going by the dell diagram - it is just like the one in the "link" from these chats. My
problem is - what the heck is the difference from a 60mm, 80, 90mm etc. fan ? I have not opened 'er up yet to get back in there. Just techie'd it down to Not power supply fan, Not case fan - so there's only one left.......the P III on an old intel board. When it spins up, it almost whistles. Then it settles a bit, and gives off & on spits of whistling. Needless to say, I run only for short periods and monitor heat - until I drag this operation to the table and do the fix.

I went all over to avoid opening it up. I would rather just do it once....after purchase. Opening the mini tower does nothing for me - there are four cages and ps in the way of the view of board/ fan area. Call me lazy...but, it's a great machine - I don't wanna bungle it. AND...I do not own a metric measure of any kind - so I'd be all over conversions to match up that way.
And Dell specs tell you little to nothing by way of precise part descriptions....ugh.

Thanks for letting me barge in. Nan

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Hmm.. *trying to get the picture*

Differences between 70mm and 120 mm fans (except dimensions) is the airflow, Rpms and noise.
Bigger fan=higher airflow.
Bigger fan=less Rpms
Less Rpms=lower noise.

70 mm fan is what you need. Something like this[IMG]http://www.endpcnoise.com/e/images/items/axp-3200.jpg[/IMG]

but, the price tagged with this one ($24.95) is worth a criminal investigation. BTW that is the price for fan AND heatsink. You need to replace a fan, not the whole cooling (heatsinks do not break). That is very simple (4 screws and a 3-pin cable).

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Best option, methinks, is a little bit of searching on NewEgg.com (if you're a US citizen, as NewEgg only ships there accordingly), for practically any Socket A model heatsink, since Socket A is a standard size. It'll fit, but if you're looking for more airflow, you'd have to compare the RPM of the fan to the diameter/diagonal/radius, or however those millimeter measurements work.

Of course, with a larger fan size, there's more airflow. You don't need to spin the fan nearly as fast with a 90mm in comparison to a 70mm, therefore limiting noise. With this reasoning, I'm looking for a case on my new build that will have 2+ 120mm fans, to minimize noise, and keep airflow efficient.

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Hi folks, You came up in my own search. I am trying to get a replacement fan for my prec.wrkstation - and going by the dell diagram - it is just like the one in the "link" from these chats. My
problem is - what the heck is the difference from a 60mm, 80, 90mm etc. fan ? I have not opened 'er up yet to get back in there. Just techie'd it down to Not power supply fan, Not case fan - so there's only one left.......the P III on an old intel board. When it spins up, it almost whistles. Then it settles a bit, and gives off & on spits of whistling. Needless to say, I run only for short periods and monitor heat - until I drag this operation to the table and do the fix.

I went all over to avoid opening it up. I would rather just do it once....after purchase. Opening the mini tower does nothing for me - there are four cages and ps in the way of the view of board/ fan area. Call me lazy...but, it's a great machine - I don't wanna bungle it. AND...I do not own a metric measure of any kind - so I'd be all over conversions to match up that way.
And Dell specs tell you little to nothing by way of precise part descriptions....ugh.

Thanks for letting me barge in. Nan

Hi, Nan--

Unfortunately, you won't have any way to determine the size of your CPU fan without first taking apart the case. Then, since the fan should be square, just measure one side to determine the mm size (60, 80, 90, etc.), and then measure the thickness of the fan (shoud be 1 to 2 mm). Although fans are available online, I had really good luck by calling around to computer repair shops locally, and found the one I needed for only $5--no shipping and handling charges, either!

Hope this helps.

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