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I see in the tag cloud Ubuntu is liked a lot but perhaps the members think differently. So I thought I would ask which is the one true Linux distribution. From all the Linux distributions which one is the only one that can be titled pure Linux nothing more nothing less.

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Last Post by sonal_salkade
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Ubuntu, Mint, Debian, Opensuse and Fedora tend to be quite popular choices of distro, but I don't think there is any such thing as 'one true distro'.
Peoples views are different about Gnu/Linux and it's many different flavours.
What one person prefers, another may detest!

The other thing to remember is that all Gnu/Linux distros are a combination of the Linux Kernel bundled together with the complete Gnu toolchain plus lots of free software and the odd bit of non-free proprietary software here and there (the inclusion of which tends to be highly controversial in some circles!)

So if anything, as Linux IS the Kernel itself, I guess you could say that the Linux Kernel is the one true, pure Linux!

Also, there are efforts being made to standardise Gnu/Linux, try googling 'linux standard base'.
The aim of the LSB project is to standardise the entire system structure based on 'POSIX', the 'single UNIX specification' and several other standards to ensure maximum compatibility (including backwards compatibility) between Linux distros.
So in a sense, as long as all distros follow the standards set by the LSB, there would be no need for 'one true' Linux distro, as they would all be standardised.

Those are my thoughts!

Edited by JasonHippy: n/a

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Ubuntu, Mint, Debian, Opensuse and Fedora tend to be quite popular choices of distro, but I don't think there is any such thing as 'one true distro'.
Peoples views are different about Gnu/Linux and it's many different flavours.
What one person prefers, another may detest!

The other thing to remember is that all Gnu/Linux distros are a combination of the Linux Kernel bundled together with the complete Gnu toolchain plus lots of free software and the odd bit of non-free proprietary software here and there (the inclusion of which tends to be highly controversial in some circles!)

So if anything, as Linux IS the Kernel itself, I guess you could say that the Linux Kernel is the one true, pure Linux!

Also, there are efforts being made to standardise Gnu/Linux, try googling 'linux standard base'.
The aim of the LSB project is to standardise the entire system structure based on 'POSIX', the 'single UNIX specification' and several other standards to ensure maximum compatibility (including backwards compatibility) between Linux distros.
So in a sense, as long as all distros follow the standards set by the LSB, there would be no need for 'one true' Linux distro, as they would all be standardised.

Those are my thoughts!

Is there an iso download for the latest version 32 and 64 bit of that?

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If you mean the LSB, then no. As I mentioned previously, the LSB is a set of standards for Linux distros to adhere to (or at least try) in order to maintain compatibility between different distros. Basically it gives all Linux distros a common base.
Debian based systems it seems are only partly compliant because they use .deb packages rather than .rpm packages (The LSB comittee decided rpm should be the packaging system of choice for the LSB). But Debian users can use Alien to convert LSB compliant rpm's to .deb's to side-step this issue.

My point was, if all distros followed the LSB then your question about 'one true linux distro' would be completely null and void. Because they'd all have a common base and would therefore all be 'true' linux distros, regardless of their chosen window manager, desktop manager or even the package management system. That is at least, as long as their package management system supports installing LSB compliant rpm's in some form, even if it is via another tool like debian do with Alien!

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That's disappointing. :(
You can't even download an official release of the official Linux. At least I know Debian based distros don't follow the standards. Thanks for the insight anyways.

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Again I have put my two cents in but there is no question in my mind, it is the Red
Hat. I had them when it first came out. Dudly

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Of all of the current distros, Slackware are the longest running distro (started 1993), closely followed by Debian (also 1993), then Suse(1994), then Red hat(1994). So if you were to go by age/maturity, then Slackware could be considered the one true Linux!
See http://imgon.net/di-1HGH.png

Also Debian and Red hat both serve as a basis for lots of derivative distros. So again, this could put either of them into contention for the 'one true Linux' too.

BTW: I looked into the LSB a bit further and it seems that Debian are on the LSB committee and are technically compliant. Their only minor failing is that their package manager cannot handle rpm's. But as mentioned, by using Alien, Debian users (and users of derivatives) can convert LSB compliant rpm's to .deb's which they can install, so it's really a non-issue.
Also the LSB packages are not installed by default in Debian, but are available in the repos. So if you want your Debian based system to be LSB compliant, you can install the relevant package/s yourself.

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Thanks for that. I shall download the 6 dvd's required on my louzy internet connection and perhaps in 6 days the 6 dvd's will be download and I can see what Slackware looks like. :)

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