I need some suggestions on a good cloud server I could use to backup my computer. I want to backup my data (music, pictures, videos, etc...) and I also want to make it better and easier to sync between my desktop and laptop for my coding projects. I currently have a Mega account but I want to find something that doesn't need to install a binary file on my computer and something that will work well with rsync. I have between 150 & 200 Gigs to backup.

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AFAIK all such services require you install some software for the purpose. Which is no surprise really.
What you'd need is a VPS somewhere with ssh access.
You wouldn't need a lot of CPU power, but more than the basic level of storage and maybe bandwidth too.

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I suggest a home backup solution using a raspberry pi and a hard drive. See this article for example http://www.howtogeek.com/139433/how-to-turn-a-raspberry-pi-into-a-low-power-network-storage-device/

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AFAIK all such services require you install some software for the purpose. Which is no surprise really.
What you'd need is a VPS somewhere with ssh access.
You wouldn't need a lot of CPU power, but more than the basic level of storage and maybe bandwidth too.

yes, setting up your own NAS would be cheapest. Of course it may be a violation of your ISP's terms of service.

Setting up something in my home is not an option. When I was young our house burned down so my back need to be outside of my own house. Now, how and why would setting up a NAS violate my ISP's terms of service?

A few service providers even offered a pay-per-use billing model in Cloud, where users would only pay of the resources that their sites/applications have actually used.
Know more about Ways to boost your Startup with Cloud servers

You have three possibilities from what I surmise your requirements to be:

  1. As mentioned by others, use a local NAS on your lan and share your files that way,
  2. Pay the client tax, and use some commecial offering like Backblaze, Dropbox etc.
  3. Self-host. Get yourself a Linux service at an ISP and use that to sync via rsynv over ssh or WebDAV or the like.

I use the third option for most of my stuff (Rackspace and Dreamhost are both more than sufficient for your needs in this) and Dropbox for the rest.

As in all things, though, handle with care/your mileage may vary/contents may settle in transit/T's and C's apply/etc/etc/etc

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