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Dear ALL,

This forum helps me much..and I thank you to everyone who makes this forum useful, even enjoyable.
i'd like to ask to all of you, HOW TO CONFIGURE NTP (TIME SERVER) on Red Hat Linux.?

I've been trying to setting the NTP across my network, but I never make it done.

PS: My computers not connect to Internet, so please let me know how to configure the NTP only on my Local Area Network.

Thnanks a lot for your next reply.

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Last Post by Assembly Guy
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Configuring NTP locally is pointless because it will not be able to update from the main pool of time servers which are on the internet.

Really, this is like having a DNS server without the internet as well...which is pretty pointless as well.

But if you still think this is a good idea (which, if it cannot update itself via the internet at the beginning...the ntp server will only show the time that you set it to be)

yum -y install ntp

Open up /etc/ntp.conf and configure it to your liking.

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Hi,

Can you tell me what should be written in /etc/ntp.conf file for server and client.

Assume my server IP is 192.16.81.10 and client IP is 192.16.81.9.
I do not want any authentication.

I need to synchronize this setup on an urgent basis, so any help is really appreciated.


Configuring NTP locally is pointless because it will not be able to update from the main pool of time servers which are on the internet.

Really, this is like having a DNS server without the internet as well...which is pretty pointless as well.

But if you still think this is a good idea (which, if it cannot update itself via the internet at the beginning...the ntp server will only show the time that you set it to be)

yum -y install ntp

Open up /etc/ntp.conf and configure it to your liking.

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Hi,

Can you tell me what should be written in /etc/ntp.conf file for server and client.

Assume my server IP is 192.16.81.10 and client IP is 192.16.81.9.
I do not want any authentication.

I need to synchronize this setup on an urgent basis, so any help is really appreciated.

on server
# yum install ntp
# chkconfig ntpd on
# vi /etc/ntp.conf
add a line
restrict default ignore
restrict 202.54.1.5 mask 255.255.255.245
server 202.54.1.5
(Replace 202.54.1.5 and mask with actual remote ISP or ntp.org NTP server IP. Save and close the file.)
then client configuration
#vi /etc/ntp.conf
add a line like
server <NTP server IP>
restrict <server IP>mask <subnet mask>
#iptables -F
#ntpdate -b <server IP>
now all is done

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I know this is an old thread but I got to say, way to be a jerk TKS. Do you REALLY think having a DNS server without the internet is pointless? Really?
What do you do if you have a bunch of machines that are not allowed on the internet, memorize all their IPs?
dude...

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Hi everybody,

Look, I want sincronize my Red Hat System (clock) with another system (windows XP).

amaloo047, I must do everything write for you.

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I'd like to re-open this old thread.
I have test machines in a lab. The lab has a firewall and is blocking ports that go to NTP pools outside of the lab. I am looking for instructions on how to setup a Linux (CentOS 6.4 x64) machine as a NTP server, and have a bunch of other Linux and Windows machines use it as a time source.

I don't care if the Linux NTP server's time is wrong, as long as all the machines time's are in synch, I can test in the lab successfully.

I also second the response by Jman - Having a DNS without an Internet connection is very important, the response by TKS seemed a bit ignorant (unless you have 2 computers connected with a crossover wire with static IPs 10.0.0.1 and 10.0.0.2). TKS, have you ever worked in a Lab?

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You probably shouldn't have re-opened this thread; you'll be better off starting your own thread. You've not added any relevant information to this thread which hadn't already been contributed by other members previously.

This topic has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.
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