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There are some website that I can never get. I always get a browser timed out message when I try to get these sites on one specific pc. Other than in the Windows firewall (which I have turned off) are there places in Windows that I should check to see if these sites are on an excluded list? these are business sites not off-color sites by the way. I can get these sites on other PCs on the network and I have tried IE, Netscape and Firefox so I don't think it's a browser issue?

Any ideas? Thanks

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Last Post by DMR
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Hello,

Check to see if it is a DNS problem.

Open a command window, and type in "ping x" where x is the name of the website. Then, take the raw numbers it gives you (reply from w.x.y.z) and put that in the web browser. If that works, then the problem is DNS related.

For example:

Open the Command Window.
type in "ping www.daniweb.com"
--> the machine should reply with: Reply from 67.18.73.107
Open a new web browser. In the address box, type in "http://67.18.73.107"
--> the machine should find DaniWeb and show you the homepage.

Of course, leave out the quotes in this example.

If the website draws up just fine, you have a DNS problem. If it does not, you have a routing problem.

Christian

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I can ping the site! (66.150.167.148) When I put the Ip address in the browser, I still get the message "The operation timed out while trying to contact..."

So this is a routing problem?

Check to see if it is a DNS problem.

Open a command window, and type in "ping x" where x is the name of the website. Then, take the raw numbers it gives you (reply from w.x.y.z) and put that in the web browser. If that works, then the problem is DNS related.

For example:

Open the Command Window.
type in "ping www.daniweb.com"
--> the machine should reply with: Reply from 67.18.73.107
Open a new web browser. In the address box, type in "http://67.18.73.107"
--> the machine should find DaniWeb and show you the homepage.

Of course, leave out the quotes in this example.

If the website draws up just fine, you have a DNS problem. If it does not, you have a routing problem.

Christian

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are there places in Windows that I should check to see if these sites are on an excluded list?

1. In your Internet Options control panel, check the Restricted Sites section under the Security tab.

2. Open your "hosts" file in Windows Notepad. In XP the file resides in the c:\windows\system32\drivers\etc\ folder; in Win 2000 it resides in c:\winnt\system32\drivers\etc\. Aside from some comment lines (lines beginning with the "#" sign) at the beginning of the file, it should usually contain only the following line:

127.0.0.1 localhost

If it contains other lines, especially those which refere to the URLs you can't reach, delete those lines and save the newly-modified file.

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DMR - Thank You, Thank You, Thank You!

The site I was having problems with was indeed on the "hosts" file (but not on the restricted list.) I removed it and now, after weeks of tweeks, downloads and optomization, I can get the site to load again.

What is this "hosts" file? Any idea how this site got on it?

Thanks again.

1. In your Internet Options control panel, check the Restricted Sites section under the Security tab.

2. Open your "hosts" file in Windows Notepad. In XP the file resides in the c:\windows\system32\drivers\etc\ folder; in Win 2000 it resides in c:\winnt\system32\drivers\etc\. Aside from some comment lines (lines beginning with the "#" sign) at the beginning of the file, it should usually contain only the following line:

127.0.0.1 localhost

If it contains other lines, especially those which refere to the URLs you can't reach, delete those lines and save the newly-modified file.

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You're welcome; glad we could help. :)

What is this "hosts" file? Any idea how this site got on it?

Here's an explanation I posted in answer to a similar question an earlier thread:

The entries in the "hosts" file are mappings of host names/URLs to their respective IP addresses. This is essentially like having a small DNS server on your own computer, in that when you type a URL into your browser (or click on a link to a URL on a web page), Windows will look in the hosts file to see if the URL you typed/clicked has a matching IP address there. If so, Windows will direct your browser to that IP address; if not, Windows will then look to your DNS servers to match the URL with an actual IP address. (The use of hosts files was how hostname-to-IP address mapping/resolution was done before DNS was invented.)

The problem with this method is that:

A) By default, Windows will consult the local hosts file before consulting any DNS servers on your network or on the Internet.

B) There is no error checking at all concerning validity of the mappings in your hosts file. You (or someone else) can put any hostname-to-IP mapping entry you want into the hosts file; when your browser encounters that hostname, it will automatically ty to go to the associated IP address listed in hosts.

Just for grins, you can test this yourself.

1. Put the following entry at the end of your hosts file and save the file:

64.233.167.99 www.spooge.com

2. Open a web browser and type this in the location/address box:

http://www.spooge.com

If your browser took you to Google, congratulations- you've just demonstrated what a huge security hole the hosts file presents. :mrgreen:

*Setting the "read only" attribute on the hosts file can keep viruses, hijackers, etc. from making unwanted changes to the file.

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Thanks again! It almost takes an inhouse computer guru to workPCs these days.

You're welcome; glad we could help. :)

Here's an explanation I posted in answer to a similar question an earlier thread:

The entries in the "hosts" file are mappings of host names/URLs to their respective IP addresses. This is essentially like having a small DNS server on your own computer, in that when you type a URL into your browser (or click on a link to a URL on a web page), Windows will look in the hosts file to see if the URL you typed/clicked has a matching IP address there. If so, Windows will direct your browser to that IP address; if not, Windows will then look to your DNS servers to match the URL with an actual IP address. (The use of hosts files was how hostname-to-IP address mapping/resolution was done before DNS was invented.)

The problem with this method is that:

A) By default, Windows will consult the local hosts file before consulting any DNS servers on your network or on the Internet.

B) There is no error checking at all concerning validity of the mappings in your hosts file. You (or someone else) can put any hostname-to-IP mapping entry you want into the hosts file; when your browser encounters that hostname, it will automatically ty to go to the associated IP address listed in hosts.

Just for grins, you can test this yourself.

1. Put the following entry at the end of your hosts file and save the file:

64.233.167.99 www.spooge.com

2. Open a web browser and type this in the location/address box:

http://www.spooge.com

If your browser took you to Google, congratulations- you've just demonstrated what a huge security hole the hosts file presents. :mrgreen:

*Setting the "read only" attribute on the hosts file can keep viruses, hijackers, etc. from making unwanted changes to the file.

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Thanks again!

And again- you're welcome. Glad we could be of help and shed some light on the subject.

It almost takes an inhouse computer guru to workPCs these days.

That's one of those eternal "what comes around, goes around" issues when it comes to computers. Remember that users of early computers, among other cryptic and arcane procedures, had to be taught how to enter their information via punch-cards (and yes, I remember that). :mrgreen:

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