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Question,

We ghost images, here and when we ghost an image the newly ghosted image boots in Sysprep. I believe it does this because it creates a new SID which SHOULD NOT be identical from the image that was brought down correct?

However the images we have don't have Service pack 2. So someone in our department had the bright idea of ghosted one that did have the service pack two and ghost it.

however when they ghosted that one, it did not boot into syspreo b/c it wasn't done so like that.

So the situation is is that there are a number of laptops here, that are ghosted properly and some have identical SID which in the long run will cause problems in the network correct?


How do i find out which of these laptops are the ones that have identical SID's?


Thanks in advance for your help

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Last Post by test
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now I grew up understanding SID to be the same as UID. Sun/Solaris ID & User ID.

As far as ghost was concerned yes ghosting a FRESHLY loaded machine is the proper way. but it works best in an environment where DHCP is on, primary & seconday DNS
is universal, printer pools are universal as are workgroups and all platforms are exactly the same.
Youll still have to set the machine name after ghost has occured. We always do virus and OS updates after a ghost.

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Hello,

For the long run, yes, there are bound to be problems with computers that have the same SID numbers on them. I have not personally tested what you did there, but if the machine was ghosted without sysprep, I bet that the computer name will be the same on all of them too.

Might be able to track them down based on what the computer name is. Otherwise, the SID is in the registry, and I bet you will need to track down some sort of Registry Robot that can go and find those things.

If your company has a SUS server, that is a great way to deploy patches in a managed fashion. Or, you could use a domain policy to push the .msi files down and force an install that way. I have been playing with that type of deployment on my test network at home.

Christian

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Yes, the Computer names have been changed.. but your saying is that the SID will be burried in the registry, and i will need a registry guru to look into that right?

Hello,

For the long run, yes, there are bound to be problems with computers that have the same SID numbers on them. I have not personally tested what you did there, but if the machine was ghosted without sysprep, I bet that the computer name will be the same on all of them too.

Might be able to track them down based on what the computer name is. Otherwise, the SID is in the registry, and I bet you will need to track down some sort of Registry Robot that can go and find those things.

If your company has a SUS server, that is a great way to deploy patches in a managed fashion. Or, you could use a domain policy to push the .msi files down and force an install that way. I have been playing with that type of deployment on my test network at home.

Christian

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Finding the machine SID In XP:

1. RUN, REGEDIT
2. EDIT, FIND, Search For value "sidstring"
3. Woops... ther sid is!! :cheesy:


DURANGO ~KORB


for a new SID you can use NEWSID by Systernals : do a Websearch

0

...ok so "sidstring" in the registry MAY NOT BE the PC's SID...

BUT...
There is a killer FREE program the finds it fast and easy!
It will also generate a random NEW sid for you.

http://www.sysinternals.com

THE PROGAM IS CALLED: NEWSID. There is no setup. Just unzip and click to find your SID.
Even runs from a network folder!

~KORB

Finding the machine SID In XP:

1. RUN, REGEDIT
2. EDIT, FIND, Search For value "sidstring"
3. Woops... ther sid is!! :cheesy:


DURANGO ~KORB


for a new SID you can use NEWSID by Systernals : do a Websearch

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