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Hi, I recent had some trouble booting windows XP. It was fine when i turned it off one night then the next day i started getting BSOD when windows reached the splashscreen.

I uninstalling windows XP and reinstalling it but i still get the same BSOD.

Strange thing is i can get on windows as long as im in the safe mode. Which im in now.

I have scanned my computer with software reccomended to me in the virus section but the results returned no viruses found.

The BSOD error is as follows

STOP: 0x0000007F (0x00000000, 0x00000000, 0x00000000, 0x00000000)

I looked up the error and found it was caused by a driver or hardware. Im using a laptop which has a faulty DVD/RW drive so i removed that and it seemed to fix the problem for a day or so.

However earlier today i recieved the same BSOD and again windows fails to boot at the splashscreen.
Once it reaches the splashscreen it will quickly flash to a BSOD then restart the computer.

I disabled automatic restart and was able to get the error code.

On the Recovery Console i repaired the disk and was told that one or more error had been solved but the computer still fails to boot up windows XP.

I would appreciate any help that you guys can give me.

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Last Post by vlim
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One of the following two errors would explain why it freezes on the splash screen.

1. Either a physical RAM error. RAM chips aren't forever, sometimes you get bad bits. A memory test should be able to tell you this. There is one on the Ubuntu Live CD. A certain degree of errors is acceptable, so dont get a heart attack if an error pops up. You will have to run the test a couple hours. If its not this,

2. your Operating system is corrupt. This happens more often than most people think. A system, especially one that is used a lot, needs a reload every once in a while. The corrupt OS would most likely cause a crash in the same place.

It is possible that it is some strange virus or incorrect driver configuration. Try a system restore if you can access it. Most likely it is one of the errors above.

I hope this helps.

Good luck

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I'm trying a "long shot" suggestion which might not apply to your situation, but, here goes:
I have found that by unplugging the coomputer and waiting for about 20 seconds before attempting to re-start, problems of problematic "residual memory" can be cured. It could be that you have been unplugging your laptop before trying to re-boot, but the battery still is connected and saving errors that you want to get rid of.
I would suggest that you remove the battery from your laptop, wait a short while and then replace it and try to start up again.
I don't give any guarantees, but it is a simple enough cure to try.
Here's wishing you luck.

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I'm trying a "long shot" suggestion which might not apply to your situation, but, here goes:
I have found that by unplugging the coomputer and waiting for about 20 seconds before attempting to re-start, problems of problematic "residual memory" can be cured. It could be that you have been unplugging your laptop before trying to re-boot, but the battery still is connected and saving errors that you want to get rid of.
I would suggest that you remove the battery from your laptop, wait a short while and then replace it and try to start up again.
I don't give any guarantees, but it is a simple enough cure to try.
Here's wishing you luck.

That is a very unlikely situation. Anything is possible though. For a laptop, complete battery removal will be needed, make sure you earth yourself and the battery before removal! Removing the battery while the device is on could permanently corrupt your hdd so be careful. For a desktop, I dont see this being applicable, the power supply can hold charge for up to a couple weeks, that is why it is contained in its own casing. You would have to disconnect the power supply from the motherboard and all the other devices and reconnect it for this to work. Please don't electrocute yourself! If you need better instructions to do this, please feel free to ask.

I would still go with one of the previous solutions. This scenario is very remote. Maybe one in a million startups.

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The memory check is a very good place to start. If that passes fine you most likely have a hardware failure. It can be a video card problem or a modem problem. You could go into your device manager and disable anything you are not using (i.e. modem, wireless if you're using a wired connection, ect.) It can be drivers also...so be sure to get the correct drives for ALL your hardware. You could also try Ubuntu on it and see if it causes errors as well.

Hope this advice was helpful.

Please let the group know if you figure it out.

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As I said--it's a long shot guess. I've never tried the solution with a laptop, but many times have successfully overcome booting problems this way with my desk top computer. When I unplug the power line from the mobo I count twenty seconds before reinserting the plug. The battery that retains the time-setting memory seems not to keep things going in the system memory.
As to grounding cautions when disconnecting the laptop battery, that comment is well in place. I took it for granted that the laptop would be turned off before attempting that step---your having called attention to it though, is certainly in place. Sometimes we take the most obvious for granted, when we shouldn't. An estra word of caution is always in place.
Bottom line: I still think it's worth a try.

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If you're able to boot up in safe mode run a checkdisk to do this...
- On your desktop double click My Computer->right click Local Disk(C:)-> click on Properties -> click on the Tab Tools -> click on Check Now-> check the two boxes options -> click start.
Just follow instruction from here on.

Once your done with the above procedure do the following...

Configure your computer to start from the CD-ROM drive. For more information about how to do this, refer to your computer's documentation or contact your computer manufacturer. Then insert your Windows XP Setup CD, and restart your computer.

1. When the Press any key to boot from CD message is displayed on your screen, press a key to start your computer from the Windows XP CD.
2. Press ENTER when you see the message To setup Windows XP now, and then press ENTER displayed on the Welcome to Setup screen.
3. Do not choose the option to press R to use the Recovery Console.
4. In the Windows XP Licensing Agreement, press F8 to agree to the license agreement.
5. Make sure that your current installation of Windows XP is select
in the box, and then press R to repair Windows XP.
6. Follow the instructions on the screen to complete Setup

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If you're able to boot up in safe mode run a checkdisk to do this...
- On your desktop double click My Computer->right click Local Disk(C:)-> click on Properties -> click on the Tab Tools -> click on Check Now-> check the two boxes options -> click start.
Just follow instruction from here on.

Once your done with the above procedure do the following...

Configure your computer to start from the CD-ROM drive. For more information about how to do this, refer to your computer's documentation or contact your computer manufacturer. Then insert your Windows XP Setup CD, and restart your computer.

1. When the Press any key to boot from CD message is displayed on your screen, press a key to start your computer from the Windows XP CD.
2. Press ENTER when you see the message To setup Windows XP now, and then press ENTER displayed on the Welcome to Setup screen.
3. Do not choose the option to press R to use the Recovery Console.
4. In the Windows XP Licensing Agreement, press F8 to agree to the license agreement.
5. Make sure that your current installation of Windows XP is select
in the box, and then press R to repair Windows XP.
6. Follow the instructions on the screen to complete Setup

I wanted to suggest this too. Running the repair off the XP cd is the same as reinstalling windows, only that its around your current installation and keeps all your data.

This has a fairly good chance of working if it is the operating system. You should try this before formatting anything and installing XP from scratch.

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Alright im trying some of those suggestions now. I was wondering tho. How come windows can boot into safe mode and not the normal boot. If there was a hardware failure would the safe mode not be broken aswell?

Update: I ran the repair of the xp CD but i still get the boot crash. Im going to replace the RAM now and see if that makes a difference.

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Uninstalled the ran and replaced it with ram from another laptop. Laptops are identical and so was the ram. unfortunitly this made no change to the error booting

Any other suggestions? im going to remove the battery and leave it to morning before i install it again.

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Look - the Blue Screen Of Death means one thing and only one thing: Bad memory management.

This is either hardware (faulty RAM chips) or software (corrupt memory management applications).

A hardware fault could affect different parts of your RAM, which would explain that you can go into safe mode but not normal mode. This is quite unlikely though. Running a memory test should give you a better idea. The Ubuntu Live cd has a memory test. Boot up with the cd and run the memory test. Some degree of errors are normal, so don't get a heart attack when something pops up. It will have to run for a couple hours for accurate results.

Regarding software - it has to be your operating system. Windows clogs up over time, it just happens. Every windows computer, depending on the level of usage and kind of usage, needs a good format and reload once in a while to clear it up. Files get corrupted from clogs, bad development, interfering applications, pretty much anything really. Safe mode configurations are kept separate for this very reason.

If you cannot pick up anything in the memory test, I suggest that you back up all your files on an external from safe mode and format your hdd and reinstall windows from scratch. Unfortunately, this is this last resort. Luckily you should be able to keep your data!

Good luck

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Guys problems fixed.

It ended up being the Battery. Not sure why. Didnt hold a charge but once i replaced that it worked fine.

Thanks for all the suggestions and the help.

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I had this same problem on a Acer desktop recently and I narrowed it down to a bad HD controller or a bad HD. Since I couldn't get into windows at all I just replaced the HD and reinstalled windows. Problem solved. Depending on how how bad the HD is you might be able to hook it up through USB and use Knoppix Live CD to retrieve all of some of your data.

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Uninstalled the ran and replaced it with ram from another laptop. Laptops are identical and so was the ram. unfortunitly this made no change to the error booting

Any other suggestions? im going to remove the battery and leave it to morning before i install it again.

It seems like you do have a corrupted file, since you are able to boot up on your laptop in safe mode. Try this one, boot up in safe mode then do a system restore. Restore it on the date when you are able to boot up successfully.
To do a system restore, click Start->Help and Support, and you will find the "System Restore" here. If this doesn't work post it, we gonna try another possible fix.

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