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I hate this FREAKING "Your current security settings put your compute at risk" Message!!!

I have tried changing permissions on the following files:
wscapi.dll
wscsvc.dll
wscui.dll

Renamed them all to .bak files
Went into registry and deleted the wscsvc registry key under HKLM/system/current control set/ services
Rebooted the machine and it still comes back.

I can't use GPEDIT.MSC because in MS's INFINITE STUPIDITY they removed it from the home versions of VISTA and I have Home Premium!!

Its not like anybody in all th 900 Million people in the world that use Windows would ever want to use GPEDIT.MSC in VISTA HOME now would they!@!!!

I am a PC tech with plenty of experience and understand the consequences of disabling "windows security settings" but they are TOOO ANNOYING to work with on a daily basis, and of course a DECENT AV, SPyware, Adware program will do 1 Million times more to protect your computer any way!!


HELP

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Last Post by mousetopher
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What about actually changing your Internet security settings? Like noting what they are now then briefly setting them to maximum (or minimum - IE can be strange)?

Might there be some Javascript setting that needs changing?

It might be the only way of getting rid of the message - mess with your security settings.

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What about actually changing your Internet security settings? Like noting what they are now then briefly setting them to maximum (or minimum - IE can be strange)?

Might there be some Javascript setting that needs changing?

It might be the only way of getting rid of the message - mess with your security settings.

That is the problem.
I have them set at what I want and that is why the message keeps coming up.
I have them set below "recommended settings" by microsoft and this is why the message is coming up.

I just can't figure out why it still comes up when the Service is supposed to be disabled and the Reg Key is Deleted!!!

IKE

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http://www.itechtalk.com/thread4454.html

Am I off beam again with the above link?

Your on the right track, but unfortunately there is no security center service in the services box!!!!!

Now how does that service run when its not even listed in services????

Microsoft is getting TOOO CRAFTY for our own good!!!

IKE

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It may not be listed in Services due to the fact you took the aggressive approach of hacking reg and taking away core files... now Windows sees the security level is vulnerable. Because of those changes, it might make actually turning off the service (can be done quite easily without all the hacking) nigh on impossible.

Microsoft is getting TOOO CRAFTY for our own good!!!

No, just making it difficult for the novice to to disable, as they are the ones who need this protection the most - and will be the first to go screaming at MS if their system gets invaded as a result

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Your on the right track, but unfortunately there is no security center service in the services box!!!!!

Now how does that service run when its not even listed in services????

Microsoft is getting TOOO CRAFTY for our own good!!!

IKE

I'm running Vista Home Premium and there IS a Security Center service in the Services list.

I can disable the service as per the link I gave you. So what's different about your system?

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Then explain to me how a servcie can be running when its not in the Registry, the files DO NOT EXIST, and its not listed in SERVICES??

I can reinstall it in the registry value, because I am not as you say " a Novice" and have enough common sense to ALWAYS Export the key or values PRIOR to deleting from the registry!!!

And I was following instructions from a Link on here when I did the steps I did.

IKE

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I think you need to focus on the difference between your Vista HP and mine. I've not changed the registry and you have. The registry is referenced in constructing the services list.

I'm not a registry expert - settings are often in two places and this might be the case here. I don't know - just a thought.

Any EXE or COM program can run without being registry dependent and it can call a DLL. I suspect that the WSS is not registry dependent for its operation. A registry dependent program would crash when that dependency failed.

If you repair the WSS (WSC) to its normal state, then perhaps the link I provided will work for you like it did for me.

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Then explain to me how a servcie can be running when its not in the Registry, the files DO NOT EXIST, and its not listed in SERVICES??

I can reinstall it in the registry value, because I am not as you say " a Novice" and have enough common sense to ALWAYS Export the key or values PRIOR to deleting from the registry!!!

And I was following instructions from a Link on here when I did the steps I did.

IKE

OK, calm down and we'll go through this, step by step.

As mentioned above, not everything is entirely dependent on the registry - true. I do still suspect that by removing registy elements, and renaming core files, you haven't actually disabled the process... just the means to shut it off :S

Luckily you were wise enough to back-up registry context, and only renamed the file-extension on core files, so may be remedied, so let's go.

After further digging on the topic, the Security Center actually needs to be fully turned off before you go disabling it - I guess to make more tamper-proof from malware etc. So you are going to NEED to get it back up and running to start off. Once fully switched off, can then easilly disable the whole thing.

Now in the case of the Group Policy Editor, like most elements removed from Home editions of XP or Vista, it can e hacked back in (done it myself before). Have a look at the link below for a guide. As to MS's decision to remove from Home editions... let's face it, 95% percent of "home" users would be more likely to bugger things up if they had such tools at hand, and most power users are either using higher SKU's or using hacks to re-add to tools anyhow.

Anyhow, take a deep breath, and let us know how you go :)

http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/windows-vista/add-group-policy-editor-to-control-panel/

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......Now in the case of the Group Policy Editor, like most elements removed from Home editions of XP or Vista, it can e hacked back in (done it myself before). Have a look at the link below for a guide. As to MS's decision to remove from Home editions... let's face it, 95% percent of "home" users would be more likely to bugger things up if they had such tools at hand, and most power users are either using higher SKU's or using hacks to re-add to tools anyhow.

http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/windows-vista/add-group-policy-editor-to-control-panel/

The link you provided adds a shortcut to Control Panel. How do you add the Group Policy Editor itself to Vista HP? Or did I miss something?

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Hmmm - a little redfaced here. I do know for a fact that it can be added but can't for the life of me find the info on how to do it (steered away from Home editions long ago)

To the author of this post - in hunting for the method, I did find a question you posted here asking the same question months ago, and you were provided with the info to do pretty much everything the Policy Editor can do via the registry - why haven't you made use of it?? It would have saved you a world of grief.

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To the author of this post - in hunting for the method, I did find a question you posted here asking the same question months ago, and you were provided with the info to do pretty much everything the Policy Editor can do via the registry - why haven't you made use of it?? It would have saved you a world of grief.

Hi Kanine,
Actually that was when I was setting up a Learning Center and after a couple weeks, I never got any helpful responses, so I just reformatted the machines and installed XP Pro SP3 on them and then set them up.
I was on a time line and didn't have forever to wait.

But I will try that GPEDIT hack on my machine.
As for my original post I was able to resolve the issue with the help of another forum.
Thanks to all who replied and tried to help.

IKE

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Any use? Haven't tried this:

http://www.goodtechtips.com/how-to-get-group-policy-editor-in-windows-vista-home-edition/

OK tried the steps listed here, but a couple of problems

First it won't allow me to paste the files in windows/system32 folder (the .dll files are already there and it won't let me overwrite them)
Secondly it allows me to copy .adm files and run gpedit.msc
but when I run it it comes up with an error saying unable to create snapin!!

Any ideas on how to fix this??

IKE

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I tried this and got the same problem. So near yet so far!

Did your Regsvr32 steps all work? Mine didn't all work.

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Hi Kanine,
Reference the MS Technet post.
I went back and re-read them and if you remember right,
they never came up with a fix for Vista Home
Al the ideas they came up with were for other versions of Vista or to use Windows Server software.

I just downgraded those machines to XP Pro SP3 and went on from there.

IKE

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I tried this and got the same problem. So near yet so far!

Did your Regsvr32 steps all work? Mine didn't all work.

Every time AI tried to run regsvr32 I got the same error.
"The dll file (file name) was loaded, but the entry point DllRegisterServer was not found" Then it goes on to ensure that the file is a valid dll or ocx file.

Hmm wonder what MS has done to the files to do this to them.

IKE

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Now in the case of the Group Policy Editor, like most elements removed from Home editions of XP or Vista, it can e hacked back in (done it myself before). Have a look at the link below for a guide. As to MS's decision to remove from Home editions... let's face it, 95% percent of "home" users would be more likely to bugger things up if they had such tools at hand, and most power users are either using higher SKU's or using hacks to re-add to tools anyhow.QUOTE]

As for GPE 99% of home users more than likely wouldn't even know it existed on their machines in the first place.
And as for MS's decision to remove it, its kind of like with car radios, just because 99% of people don't use cassettes doesn't mean that that 1% might still use them, but they aren't in radios any more are they? And being that I work on Systems all the time, GPE would come in handy for the tech side fo the house some times when working on HOME editions, especially in a network environment. You know that 99% of schools, businesses, libraries,... would NEVER justify the cost of anyting other than Home BASIC versions of Windows in most cases.
But they still might need the ability to setup policies and such.

IKE

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@CoyBoss. If you read back, I actually quite agree with you. Most home users would be more likely to bugger things up with GPE, so is probably safer not to include.

As to getting GPE added to Home Premium, I know it was in fact possible, but last time I worked with that build was nearly 2 yrs ago, so may well have been blocked even at SP1

Back to original post, you should still be able to achieve your intended goal via registry, but as I said earlier, no need to ensure service is active so you can switch everything off, before you go disabling security center.

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Hmmm - correction (too late to edit).

"Back to original post, you should still be able to achieve your intended goal via registry, but as I said earlier, no need to ensure service is active so you can switch everything off, before you go disabling security center. "

underlined area s'posed to read, "you need to ensure service is active so you can switch everything off"

Blonde moment

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Hey everyone, I'm searching for a solution to this annoyance too.

I downloaded the spreadsheet that outlines group policy settings and corresponding registry entries... the "Disable Security Settings Check Feature" is in there twice:

HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Security!DisableSecuritySettingsCheck
HKCU\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Security!DisableSecuritySettingsCheck

I can navigate as far as the Microsoft folder with regedit, but that's where the trail ends. Do I need to create a key or something? I don't have much experience with the registry, and I really want this notification bar gone. Can anyone help me out with this? :)

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Nevermind! Figured it out!

If anyone else running Vista Home is looking for a way to disable the annyoying information bar that appears when you change default IE security settings, here's your solution:

** Note, it involves editing the registry which, if done improperly, can be harmful to your system. If unsure, backup the current registry before making any changes.

(Copied and pasted from comment on http://www.astahost.com/info.php/Disable-Annoying-Information-Bar_t19272.html )

- Open regedit (Start > Run > regedit )
- Navigate to HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Security
- If those key don't exist, you'll probably have to create them. They are case-sensitive !!!
- Now, create the following DWORD (CASE SENSITIVE !!!): DisableSecuritySettingsCheck
- Give this DWORD the value: 1

Worked like a charm! ^_^ I had to create both the Internet Explorer and Security keys, and I repeated the process for the same location in HKCU. Good luck everyone! :)

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