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I guess this occured when my computer was in for repair months and months ago.


I want to take control of a folder (to change its attributes), and to do this I need to boot the computer in safe mode. When I hit "F8" after the POST, I go into the normal mode. So, I thought I would boot from the WinXP CD.

Problem: when I put in the WinXP (home) CD, the computer boot up in normal mode.......... There is no choice to made.

I can't get into safe mode running configsys as there is no 'boot.ini" tab. (the file boot.ini does exist)

The one thing I will not do is reformat the drive and reinstall WinXP (assuming I can install from the CD) as, apart from not removing the 'read only' attribute from this particular folder, everything else seems OK.

thnks for reading this. I hope it makes sense.

John

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Last Post by killinchy
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start hitting f8 as soon as you turn on the computer, you may be missing it when you wait

Edited by caperjack: n/a

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Do you see the rest of your BIOS information on the monitor while it's booting/ after POST? It could be displaying that stuff in some weird display mode and you're not seeing the prompt for the BIOS menu or boot-mode select or "boot from CD". Try just starting to pound F8 from the second you hit the power button and see if it goes into the mode menu.

As for not booting from the CD, see if you can get into your BIOS settings (F2 ?) and make sure that your CD drive is set as a boot device before your HDD.

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Thanks, guys

I am really pounding on F8 from the second I switch on, and yet it goes to normal mode. Microsoft's unhelpul "solution" is the remove WinXP, and then reinstall from my "old" cd. I'm too chicken to do that because, I might end up not beng able to reinstall WinXP.

Anyway, what is this 'older' and 'newer' version of WinXP ?

John

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Is there a long pause before it boots into windows normally, or does it go straight in? If there's a long pause, the options could be "on the screen" but aren't being displayed if the signal is out of range for the monitor. That's why I asked if you saw the other info on the screen as soon as you press the power switch (sound card info, mobo info, BIOS version, etc.)

If the boot-mode choice screen is being output but not showing up, you wouldn't know to make a choice and if you don't make a choice before the screen times out it would just boot normally.


What MS article did you read that told you to reinstall?

Also, from the content of the original post, I'm not sure how it relates to the thread title. How did you conclude that this was relevant?

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These are the different versions of XP;

Windows XP Starter Edition
This edition is aimed for first-time desktop PC users in developing countries. This edition can only run three applications at once.

Windows XP Home Edition
A version of Windows XP for home users. This edition replaced Windows 9x/ME

Windows XP Home Edition N
This is a special edition of Windows XP Home Edition for the european market
without media player

Windows XP Professional
A version of Windows XP for both businesses and home users. This edition replaced Windows 2000 Professional

Windows XP Professional N
This is a special edition of Windows XP Professional for the european market without media player

Windows XP Media Center Edition
A Windows XP version for Media Center PCs with an easy to use interface and remote control support

Windows XP Tablet PC Edition
This is a Windows XP version for Tablet PCs with pen and speech capabilities

Windows XP Professional x86 Edition
This edition is for AMD64/EMT64 64-bit processors

To check which one you are currently running, click Start/Run and type in winver, then enter.

Depending on the Brand/Manufacturer of your PC will depend on what key enters BIOS and Boot Menu/Options.
Most cases, "Delete" key to enter BIOS
F1, F2, F8 or F10 to enter Boot Menu/Options, Safe Mode etc;

The only way it could be newer than the CD would be the "Service Pack" or if it was changed from Home to Pro.

1 question, who said you had to go in to "Safe Mode" to take control (ownership) of a file or folder? You don't

Edited by Adamsappleone: n/a

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Thanks for the reply


The only way it could be newer than the CD would be the "Service Pack" or if it was changed from Home to Pro.

Yes. I'm sure my Home version hasn't been changed to the Pro version (I wish it had) because in the Pro version, you see a 'security tab' in the 'properties' of folders

1 question, who said you had to go in to "Safe Mode" to take control (ownership) of a file or folder? You don't

Using XP home, how do I take control?

I have an application (Incomedia's Website X5) that prepares files and throws into a folder it creates in \Documents and Settings\user\Local Settings\ Then it uploads them.

But, this folder is a 'read only' folder. Grrrrr

Of course, I can upload my website using filezilla, but I like things to work properly

thanks

John

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This link will show you how to install the "Security Tab" in XP Home;
http://www.misec.net/forum/board/FAQ/1144075199

Once installed, follow the directions below to take ownership.

Being logged in as "Administrator"

How to take ownership of a file
You must have ownership of a protected file in order to access it. If another user has restricted access and you are the computer administrator, you can access the file by taking ownership.

To take ownership of a file, follow these steps:

1. Right-click the file that you want to take ownership of, and then click Properties.
2. Click the Security tab, and then click OK on the Security message (if one appears).
3. Click Advanced, and then click the Owner tab.
4. In the Name list, click Administrator, or click the Administrators group, and then click OK.

The administrator or the administrators group now owns the file.

To change the permissions on the file that you now own, follow these steps:

1. Click Add.
2. In the Enter the object names to select (examples) list, type the user or group account that you want to have access to the file. For example, type Administrator.
3. Click OK.
4. In the Group or user names list, click the account that you want, and then select the check boxes of the permissions that you want to assign that user.
5. When you are finished assigning permissions, click OK.
6. You can now access the file.

How to take ownership of a folder
You must have ownership of a protected folder in order to access it. If another user has restricted access and you are the computer administrator, you can access the folder by taking ownership.

To take ownership of a folder, follow these steps:

1. Right-click the folder that you want to take ownership of, and then click Properties.
2. Click the Security tab, and then click OK on the Security message (if one appears).
3. Click Advanced, and then click the Owner tab.
4. In the Name list, click your user name, or click Administrator if you are logged in as Administrator, or click the Administrators group. If you want to take ownership of the contents of the folder, select the Replace owner on subcontainers and objects check box.
5. Click OK, and then click Yes when you receive the following message:
You do not have permission to read the contents of directory folder name. Do you want to replace the directory permissions with permissions granting you Full Control?
All permissions will be replaced if you click Yes.

Note folder name is the name of the folder that you want to take ownership of.
6. Click OK, and then reapply the permissions and security settings that you want for the folder and its contents.

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No need to pound. Just put your finger on the F8 key and start your computer. This way it definitely will not miss.

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Thanks for all the help, guys.

Adamsappleone................ I followed your post on how to get the security tab......... it worked just fine. I am very grateful.

One last little niggle

The read only box seems to have four?? states

Filled green
Green check mark
Vague coloured check mark
Empty

just wondering

Thanks

Joh

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