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My specs are
AMD Athlon(tm) 64 x2 Dual Core Processor 4200+ 2.20Ghz
2 GB Ram
ATI Radeon X1550 series
I know I can Run it but isn't 64 bit if you plan on installing more than 2 GB Ram?
Wouldn't it be useless if I don't buy more ram?
If Im wrong please explain why, will upgrading to 64 bit make my computer Faster without having to buy more ram? I have only gotten that a 64 bit is for people planning on more ram
Also is it true that using a 64bit more then doubles actual GB size for programs?
and yes All my Drivers and Video Card etc are Compatible
Btw I am a Major gamer and I play the sims 3 etc on my computer I am wondering if rendering and display performance will increase as well
Thanks~!

sorry If I make absolutely no sense I am just jotting down information I got and Questions On my head lol

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Last Post by jbennet
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  • The one major advantage of 64bit operating system is that it can fully utilize 4GB or more of physical memory (RAM). And since you only have a 2GB RAM, and all your computer specs are not so high-end, you would be better off sticking with 32bit OS. Also most of … Read More

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    jbennet 1,618   8 Years Ago

    [quote]So if you can hold off for another 2-3 years (until the next windows release - windows 8) with 32bit than you should[/quote] I am 99% certain that windows 8 will be 64 bit only, as current server-grade offerings from microsoft (exchange 2010, Server 2008 R2 etc...) are 64 bit … Read More

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The one major advantage of 64bit operating system is that it can fully utilize 4GB or more of physical memory (RAM).

And since you only have a 2GB RAM, and all your computer specs are not so high-end, you would be better off sticking with 32bit OS.

Also most of the programs and games as of today, dont utilize the full potential of 64bit. So you would hardly notice any performance difference on your PC between 64 and 32bit OS.

Even the 64bit Internet Explorer that bundles with 64bit OS, doesn't have flash player support (therefore no youtube). So it sort of ruins the point of getting 64bit OS on PC's when run less than 4GB RAM.
So if you can hold off for another 2-3 years (until the next windows release - windows 8) with 32bit than you should. By that time there will be a much wider acceptance of 64bit.

However if you are planning on upgrading your computer with a high end quad core processor, 4GB RAM, etc., within the next 6 months or so, than go ahead invest in 64bit.

Edited by Crash~Override: n/a

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The one major advantage of 64bit operating system is that it can fully utilize 4GB or more of physical memory (RAM).

And since you only have a 2GB RAM, and all your computer specs are not so high-end, you would be better off sticking with 32bit OS.

Also most of the programs and games as of today, dont utilize the full potential of 64bit. So you would hardly notice any performance difference on your PC between 64 and 32bit OS.

Even the 64bit Internet Explorer that bundles with 64bit OS, doesn't have flash player support (therefore no youtube). So it sort of ruins the point of getting 64bit OS on PC's when run less than 4GB RAM.
So if you can hold off for another 2-3 years (until the next windows release - windows 8) with 32bit than you should. By that time there will be a much wider acceptance of 64bit.

However if you are planning on upgrading your computer with a high end quad core processor, 4GB RAM, etc., within the next 6 months or so, than go ahead invest in 64bit.

Excellent Just the Answer I was Looking for I was very confused before but you cleared my mind thanks~!
Thats what I thought, there will be no point if I don't plan On upgrading my ram atm I was confused with what I read before regarding Using ram to Its Maximum I misunderstood that. they ment buying more ram obviously. again thanks so much if there is any way I can repay you please let me know

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So if you can hold off for another 2-3 years (until the next windows release - windows 8) with 32bit than you should

I am 99% certain that windows 8 will be 64 bit only, as current server-grade offerings from microsoft (exchange 2010, Server 2008 R2 etc...) are 64 bit only and they tend to like to keep the codebases the same.

Edited by jbennet: n/a

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You can go up to nearly 4GB with the 32-bit, so you still have room to nearly double your current ram before you would need 64-bit addressing.

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I am 99% certain that windows 8 will be 64 bit only, as current server-grade offerings from microsoft (exchange 2010, Server 2008 R2 etc...) are 64 bit only and they tend to like to keep the codebases the same.

You have a point, but I doubt it will be only 64bit offering. Maybe windows 9 onwards it will be 64bit only.

I still think next 3 years is too early for full transformation to 64bit. Lot of people still use low end hardware. I think 3 years seem too quick to force the full transformation to 64bit.

Also next microsoft office will be offered in both 64bit and 32bit flavors so forcing people to 64bit from windows 8 onwards seems like a stretch.

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The computer makers themselves are pushing the consumer market towards the 64 bit environment faster as they compete with one another. Having more ram is a selling point and we're marching right past 4GB fairly quickly.

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Simply put: Can a 64 lane highway handle more traffic more efficiently than a 32 lane? Of course. Whereas 32 bit os recognizes only up to 3 Gigs ram, a 64 recognizes much more (if it is installed of course). If all your drivers are indeed 64 bit compatible and you have a need for speed, definitely go with the 64 bit OS.

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Simply put: Can a 64 lane highway handle more traffic more efficiently than a 32 lane? Of course.

No. Its not more *efficient*. Its just wider.

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Which windows 7 are you getting?

Are you getting an OEM version or retail?

I don't see why you shouldn't get the 64-bit version, you can run most 32-bit applications on the 64-bit version anyway. - if you do upgrade or get another computer you could reuse windows 7 64-bit in the future.

If you have a 32-bit program though it shouldn't run any better on a 64-bit OS than on a 32-bit OS and like you say, you won't benefit memory wise. My point is you may want a 64-bit OS in the future so why limit yourself?

I know that if you get the retail version you have a choice of 32 or 64 bit version. -but it cost more.

Edited by Xlphos: n/a

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Buddy better you go for WINDOWS 7 64bit because:

With 32-bit Windows, you're stuck at 4GB of RAM, and even then, you're only using about 3.3GB of it, give or take. With 64-bit, 4GB of RAM is the new minimum standard, and with 4GB, you can run tons of applications with zero slowdown. Windows 7 (and Vista for that matter) runs so beautifully with 4GB of RAM you'll wonder how you ever did with less. It makes your system more futureproof too, so you can take your system to 8GB, 32GB or even a terabyte, before too long.

If you're not planning on going to 4GB of RAM anytime soon, you might wanna hold back, since you need 4GB of RAM to take full advantage of 64-bit's memory management. That said, RAM is so disgustingly cheap right now, and has such an intense bang-to-buck ratio, you should definitely upgrade to 4GB if you haven't already. Anyone who runs specialized or older gear (see below) should probably not jump into 64-bit.

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Of course window 7 64 bit is appreciated. They are also well supported for gaming and high programming languages. Lot many applications can be ran on this platform.

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I have 64-bit HP computer, 5 Gig RAM and 750 Gig HD. At first I tried to install 32-bit Windows 7, but it had all sorts of problems because I had too much RAM and too large a HD, so I wound up erasing that and starting all over with 64-bit Windows 7.

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but it had all sorts of problems because I had too much RAM and too large a HD,

Ive got a 1tb HDD just fine on xp sp2 32 bit.... with 8gb ram

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Ive got a 1tb HDD just fine on xp sp2 32 bit.... with 8gb ram

You may have 8gb Ram installed, but with a 32 bit OS it is very doubtful that your PC is recognizing any more than 3 gigs.The other 5 will be recognized when you install a 64 bit OS.

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You may have 8gb Ram installed, but with a 32 bit OS it is very doubtful that your PC is recognizing any more than 3 gigs.The other 5 will be recognized when you install a 64 bit OS.

I have a 64 bit OS on the other partition (win7 - xp is for games). That quote was more in relation to the HDD point AD made.

And you can get (Some) apps (SQL Server for one) to use over 4gb on a 32 bit system if you use PAE on Windows Server. But thats only for apps designed for it.

Edited by jbennet: n/a

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