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Hello all. just registered on here to ask a question please.

Just supporting someone who has currently a basic Windows server 2003 for AD and DHCP server roles for all workstations and has Microsoft Exchange 2010 installed for their Outlook Web Access for offsite email access.

What the question and description is, I will be setting up a new Windows Server 2008 on a new server Fujitsu tower with new DHCP configuration IP addresses using 10.xx.xx.xx and a file server with their roaming profiles so all workstations will connect to new server tower. Would the old 2003 server with Microsoft Exchange 2010 still work using Outlook Web Access as it will be still on the network but won’t have any workstations connected on the previous users or groups on 2003 server?

So what I’m trying to do is the old 2003 server will only have 1 role setup which will be the Outlook Exchange for Outlook Web Access and the NEW 2008 server will be for DHCP and 'Users and Groups' etc.

The current private IP address on the 2003 server is the basic 192.168.1.100 without any other DNS IP set. When I change the IP address on the old server 2003 to connect to the new 2008 server on this 10.xx.xx.xx will I need to reconfigure the Microsoft Exchange 2010 settings somewhere and the router LAN IP address??

Hope that is not too complicated..

Thank you

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Last Post by JorgeM
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The first thought that comes to minds is why the IP address change? Both the 192.168.x.x/16 and 10.x.x.x/8 subnets all fall within the private range. I cannot think of any reason, other than a shortage of IPs, why you would go through all of that work.

Secondly, if you have Exchange running, you must have Active Directory. I assume that is what you mean by "users and groups". In this scenario, you cannot just create a new 2008 server, promote is at a domain controller since the Exchange organization is already coupled with the current AD infrastructure.

Based on your description, it sounds to me like this plan can be simplified. Keep the same IP scheme and just join the 2008 server as a member server of the existing domain. With regard to DHCP, its OK for you to install it on the 2008 server, even though its not optimal to mix the DHCP service on the same box as a file server. Those roles are generally not paired. However, for a small office on a tight budget, you do what you have to without adding additional complexity.

You mentioned no DNS? If you have AD running on the 2003 box, the DNS role is most likely intalled their. All of your internal hosts should have their DNS settigns pointing to this server.

Again, i assume that this is a small office based on what you describe so far. Here is a typical network diagram, with one subnet, that can be used in this type of scenario...

Guide | Designing Active Directory for a SOHO Network

Diagram | ADSOHO0

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Thank you much appreciated.

I have always used Class A network for business as I cannot stand the typical 192.168.

The old server is not up to the capacity and speed as there is a high throughout-put because of large transfer sync and saving large data all the time onto the net drives including OST files. This is why we are adding a new server with raid gigabyte drives therefore this new server can be the DHCP server and net drives for syncing data I/O to workstations and backup.

Assuming the old server 2003 will stay as AD users and group to workstations and leave the exchange server as it is then should be no problem.

So joining the new server to 2003 as a member, I can setup the new server as a DHCP server?

Yes there is DNS setup as the DHCP server IP Address is the same as DNS.

Just if the IP address changes on the old server 2003 will I need to change any MS Exchange settings.

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So joining the new server to 2003 as a member, I can setup the new server as a DHCP server?

That is correct. Since you have AD in the environment, once the server is a member of the domain and you install the DHCP role, you need to log on that box as a member of the "Enterprise Admins" group because before the DHCP service will start, it must first be "Authorized". You do that from the DHCP admin console (admin tools folder).

Just if the IP address changes on the old server 2003 will I need to change any MS Exchange settings.

No, but just keep in mind that any internal DNS zones that have records referrencing old IPs need to be updated.

If this Exchange server is on the private network, any port forwarding rules on your router would have to be updated with the new IP.

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If this Exchange server is on the private network, any port forwarding rules on your router would have to be updated with the new IP.> Quoted Text Here

Thank you for supporting.. Yes the current old server is only on a private basic network and is conneted to the Draytek 2830 firewall router with BT Business. Not had chance to login to the GUI to see what port rule has been configured.

Thanks

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Jorge, After 2008 has joined the old 2003 domain, i suppose the server 2008 has to connect to the old DHCP using the 192.168 before i can setup the server 2008 DHCP on 10.xx.xx.xx.

After joined the server 2008, where i have to 'authorize a server' under DHCP, i understand this is done on the old 2003? by loggin into the Enterprise Admins on 2003? or is it all done on the new 2008 server?

Soz to be thick. Will try this on my test server.

Thanks

Edited by jamielee1425: Add Comments

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The new server needs to be on whatever existing subnet you have at the time of implementation. You can move the IP subnet and addresses before you add this new server.

Once joined to the domain, install DHCP already logged on as an ENT Admin, then launch the admin console from the same server to authorize. Or you can do it from the 2003 server using the same console. Either way.

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