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Hi, I would just like to know what is the difference between ISDN and Broadband ADSL. Is it the speed? And why do i have a slow connection when i am using a 256Kbps ADSL connection? Is there any way i can speed it up?

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Last Post by GrimJack
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Broadband ADSL (asymmetric digital subscriber line) typically offers downstream throughputs of 256kbps to 1Mbps and upstream of 60kbps to 256kbps.

ISDN (Integrated Services Digital Network) typically has a varied speed depending on the provider. But one can pretty much guarantee that they'll be at least 5 times as fast as a standard dial-up connection today. However, ISDN is very hard to find since DSL has kind of taken over.


Your connection speed is entirely up to how far your provider is from:

1. your residence
2. The internet backbone

There are a few things you can do to speed it up. If you use Microsoft, your transmission speed is maximised for Modem transmission. Therefore you're not maximized for packet size and transmission speed. This is usually done with registry edits...however, you can find nifty little programs out there that will do it for you. I've listed a few below:

  1. http://www.speedguide.net/downloads.php
  2. http://www.softpedia.com/public/cat/12/4/12-4-41.shtml
  3. http://www.ascentive.com/products/webROCKET.html

Hope everything works out for you and I hope I've answered your questions :)

TKS

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I googled and got:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=internet+backbone&btnG=Google+Search

then I chose:

http://www.cnet.com/Resources/Info/Glossary/Terms/internetbackbone.html

and this is where I ended:

Internet backbone
This superfast network spanning the world from one major metropolitan area to another is provided by a handful of national Internet service providers (ISPs). These organizations (including Net 99 and Alternet) use connections running at approximately 45 mbps (T3 lines) linked up at specified interconnection points called national access points (which are located in major metropolitan areas). Local ISPs connect to this backbone through routers so that data can be carried though the backbone to its destination.

Grim

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