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Hello.

I wish to setup a WAMP/Apache Server on a single Computer (server) and various touch-panels connected to this 1 server (Intranet). [i.e. all touch panels having a site http://xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (Server's IP) loaded/used on browser]

I was wondering is their a way to determine a server's peak bandwidth?
Say, if I use a Desktop model of IBM with 2 GB ram and 320GB HDD (just an arbitrary example), how much data transfer / PCs / network load it can handle (ALL TOUCH PANELS in use simultaneously)?

Also, any idea about Network Load Balancers? If the load isn't bearable for 1 server, what is to be done? Setup 2 servers? and if yes, how?

Thank you! :)

Edited by akshayinbox: n/a

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Last Post by lasitha2005d
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I was wondering is their a way to determine a server's peak bandwidth?
Say, if I use a Desktop model of IBM with 2 GB ram and 320GB HDD (just an arbitrary example), how much data transfer / PCs / network load it can handle (ALL TOUCH PANELS in use simultaneously)?

The physical limitation is likely in the NIC or drivers (if there is one at all). The Ethernet you have plugged into the port is likely running a gigabit connection directly to your machine (server). Unless you have a massive amount of machines concurrently flooding you aren't likely to approach the saturation point on gigabit.

The problem also depends on the protocol (UDP v. TCP) and what type of load these machines create (bursty v. smooth) and how you are communicating with them.

Really, the only way to know for sure the saturation point of your particular hardware/software stack is to test it to the breaking point.

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Use Apache benchmark test. There are other bm s for Linux as well. If you use windows however, NLB is not supported well with Apache (made for iis 7.0).
A list of tools and online tools
If you can make a scenario and if you know how to use bandwidth math, you can get some idea (approximately) by adding throughput and other attributes.

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