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Hi guys do you have any idea how to do the one I enclosed a red rectangle with on my screenshot? the step 1 instructions. please help I think it's not the normal thing that I do in our VLSM.

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Last Post by JorgeM
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So, you have been provided with the nework 192.168.2.0/24 and are asked to subnet it to allow up to 60 hosts. To do this, we need to apply the correct subnet mask. If you use a /26 (255.255.255.192), you can have up to 62 hosts on each subnet. With a /26, the 192.168.2.0/24 will be broken into these subnets...

192.168.2.0 - 192.168.2.63
192.168.2.64 - 192.168.2.127
192.168.2.128 - 192.168.2.191

192.168.2.192 - 192.168.2.255

Keep in mind that each subnet has 64 IPs, but two are reserved (network ID and broadcast IP). If you need two subnets, use the middle two shown above. Each subnet will provide up to 62 usable host IPs.

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As an additional note to my previous post...the reason I indicated to use the middle two is that the first subnet has all 0's for the subnet ID and the last has all 1's in the subnet ID. This was problematic for older legacy routers. Not the case any longer. So most modern gear can handle the 4 subnets. Wasnt sure about your scenario, so if the question asks for no more than two subnets, i would pick the middle two to be able to address any legacy equipment. Hope that did not confuse you.

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not a problem. hope that information helped you. Subnetting could be tricky and challenging to understand at first. Just do a few subnetting problems and it will be like riding a bike. Once you get it, it pretty easy to work with subnetting IPv4.

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