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I just got a static IP for my dsl connection.
I have a router in place(netgear rp614)
with a server running behind the router, I forwarded the ports for the server
and it worked fine yesterday, but this morning I cannot login to the server.
are there any tricks for tips for setting these up?
the server is in a remote location and is like 2 hours away from me.
so its not easy for me to go there to fix it every day.

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Last Post by DMR
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It worked fine yesterday from the remote location, or internally? Does the server behind the router have a static IP as well? I'm assuming that it does since you bought a static IP for the ISP connection, but just in case. :P

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it worked from the remote location and internally.
I could connect from my other location.
yes the server is a 192.x.x.x ip static behind the router.
does the router disconnect the service?
also if I wanted to run another server since I have 5 static IP's,
how would I do this with the router?(netgear rp614)
is it possible?
is there a site to tell me how to do this?

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read the manual for your router if you want to set it up with multiple IP adresses. If it supports it, then there will be a plethora of documentation for it in there.

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looked through the manuals and nothing.
can you suggest a router?
I want my static IPs pointing at different servers.
I am paying for 5 IPs.

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looked through the manuals and nothing.
can you suggest a router?
I want my static IPs pointing at different servers.
I am paying for 5 IPs.

You can only assign 1 static IP to the router. If you need to put additional systems on the net, you can port-forward to your internal machines.
i.e.

1.2.3.4 port 80 --> 192.168.1.10 port 80 (web server)
1.2.3.4 port 22 --> 192.168.1.11 port 22 (linux box)
etc.

If you want your systems to all have external IP's, you can run your dsl modem straight to a switch and connect your systems with static ip's to the switch.

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so could I run a cat 5 into a switch from the dsl modem then to a computer from the switch. how about from the switch to a router then to another pc? Can I use a hub or do I have to use a switch?
my dsl connection uses PPPoe. Is this a problem?

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Since you have 5 legit IPs, you could connect up to 5 machines to the modem with a switch or hub (either will work), but you'd lose the security that a firewalling/NATting router gives you.

In terms of switch->router->other PCs, yes- there's no problem with doing that.

I'd go with chanto!'s port-forwarding suggestion though, that will keep all of your machines behind the router.

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yes I want the safety of the router but he said that only one IP can be used on the router. I want 3 machines to have different static IPs that are my external IPs so I can run a ftp server, webserver and a game server.
pc 1= xxx.xxx.xxx.xx1
pc 2= xxx.xxx.xxx.xx2
pc 3= xxx.xxx.xxx.xx3
so in internet explorer I type in xxx.xxx.xxx.xx2 and it goes to my webserver and so on for the rest.I don't want them all on the same IP, this is why I got the static IPs for.I had dynamic IPs before setup like chantos said, the problem was the IPs changed all the time, and when that happened I would have to reconfigure my servers for the external IP. which was a pain since it is at a different location than me.

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I want 3 machines to have different static IPs that are my external IPs so I can run a ftp server, webserver and a game server.
pc 1= xxx.xxx.xxx.xx1
pc 2= xxx.xxx.xxx.xx2
pc 3= xxx.xxx.xxx.xx3

Man- if you're going to do that you'll have three unprotected machines, running three vulnerable services, sitting out there for anyone to have a whack at.

Unless I'm really being a muppet here (which is quite possible) I think I understand what you want, but what's so bad about using the router and just properly configuring its port-forwarding? Sure, you'll only have 1 static IP on the WAN-facing side of the router, but when you hit that IP in a web browser, the http requests will get sent via port 80 to the Web server; when you FTP to that IP, FTP requests will get routed via port 21 to the FTP server, etc.

As far as static vs dynamic IPs, you can still assign the servers static addresses even if they're behind the router.

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ok but how do I assign the static IPs from sbc to my computers that are behind the router?

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Usually you don't; you assign the machines on the local network IPs from one of the private, non-routeable ranges like 10. or 192.168. and set the router up for NAT (Network Address Translation). The router will "learn" the IPs you assign to the LAN machines, and by setting up port forwarding as in chanto!'s example, will route both outgoing and incoming requests to the proper destination. The manuals that accompany most routers do a good job of describing how to set everything up, but if you have specific questions just tell us the model of router and we can walk you through it.

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I know all that stuff for internal IPs.
earlier in the post I said I had port forwarding running and and everything worked. but I got the static IPs so I can have seperate IPs for 5 different computers. I want to be protected so they are not sitting ducks for hackers.
so I need to install firewalls on each? or put a router in for each after a hub?
so they are protected. I am not at these computers, they are at a remote location.

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OK, if you want to specifically use the IPs that you've got and access the machines from the Net that way, I'd install a good software firewall on each of them. You might want to take a look at the Zone Alarm firewall packages from Zone Labs.

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