Hi All,

We're having trouble accessing our own website after replacing our DNS server.

I can't check the settings of the old server because it had a pretty major hardware failure before we were finished replacing it.

- All other websites are working fine
- The domain here is "marymead.org.au"
- Our website (www.marymead.org.au) is hosted remotely by NetSpeed Internet

Any ideas would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Marymead-IT

Thanks for your reply lasher, you truly are an asset to the IT community and no doubt, the world. One might compare you to Gandhi...
May the seed of your loins rest fruitfully in the belly of your woman... :-|


For anyone who's not an artard, I figured out that by changing the primary DNS server on a PC to one provided by our ISP and using our local DNS server as the secondary, we now have access to everything including our website.

This had to be changed on our proxy server too to fix the issue for the majority of users who are routed through it.

Marymead-IT

Let me get the config right - you had a DNS of your own (what kind, btw? it might be important) and you also transferred the zone to your ISP, who actually bcasted it to the root servers (was the authoritative DNS for the zone). now you've removed your internal DNS server and reset the internal workstations to use the ISP's DNS. and it doesn't work?

Thanks for your reply lasher, you truly are an asset to the IT community and no doubt, the world. One might compare you to Gandhi...
May the seed of your loins rest fruitfully in the belly of your woman... :-|

why thank you dearest supervisor i doest my bestus

I wonder where the moderators are...

Lol i dunno probably in bed sleeping.

I acctually sit next to him all day and we are just playing around.

Right after he posted this he managed to solve the problem by setting the computers primary DNS server to our ISP's and left our local DNS server as the secondary one.

ha, had the same problem at my work place. We just changed our domain from .com to .local

I'm sure your way was more time efficient... =\

ah. so you used the local dns as a forwarder, not as a zone controller.

I've had this issue with an office that has a local dns server on AD (without it the workstations can't log on to windows) and three outgoing connections with different ISPs, so I had to set up every workstation (through dhcp of course) to use 4 different DNS servers for different purposes. not to mention the huge routing table and the gateway list.

sounds like a bit of a riot there dima. Lucky we only have a reasonably small network then i suppose.

size doesn't matter, remember? ;)