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Guys i want to know something from you geekers that which linux distro you like and why you like it.To help e just answer the below questions:-
1.Does it runs chromium browser.
2.Does it runs games like Half life and other popular games.
3.Does it boots fast.
4.Does it look attractive like illustraion images.
5.Does it runs on older machines.

Take tie answer me.....?

1.Does it runs chromium browser.

Unless it is a very old version of a distro, any Linux distro will run Chromium just fine. Some distros don't like Chrome because of ideological reasons (not FOSS), but you can override that if you really want Chrome instead of Chromium (but they are essentially identical).

What can be a bit more problematic is flash plugins from chromium (to be able to watch videos). I've had a few problems from time to time with that. That's the kind of thing for which it pays off to use the main (non-derivative) main-stream up-to-date distributions (Ubuntu, Fedora, etc..), because when it breaks, it doesn't break for long and solutions are easily found because of the large community of users.

For example, I used to have Elementary-OS, which is a Ubuntu derivative that tried to be very "stable" by sync'ing with relatively old (and "stable") versions of applications (and the kernel). But when I had problems with Chromium and with the flash plugin (from an Adobe update), there was basically no fix because of how old most of Elementary-OS's stuff was. So, I changed to another light-weight distro, Lubuntu, that is actually up-to-date with the official Ubuntu, solving all my problems.

2.Does it runs games like Half life and other popular games.

Before I tackle this, I have to point out that the general rule for applications in Linux is that if it runs on one distro it works on any distro. Linux is a very predictable environment (from a developer's perspective), which means that there is very rarely situations where an application will work in one distro but not in another. The only issues involve old versus new, i.e., trying to install very "new" applications on an older system could cause some issues (mostly configuration issues and conflicts, which can be resolved with some effort, but usually not worth it). So, as long as you stay up-to-date (which is easy, because it's free to update and keep everything up-to-date all the time).

For games, this has been an issue for a long time. Basically, computer game companies have traditionally never been interested in porting their games to Linux. So, the vast majority of PC computer games work only for Windows (with some supporting Mac too). But this is starting to change. Steam has started to support Linux (in part because the "SteamBox" runs on Linux) for their games, and they are porting some of their existing games (I think). Some games that support Mac OSX also support Linux because those operating systems are very similar (have much of the same underlying systems, like the kernel API (POSIX), window system (X server), and 3D graphics API (OpenGL), making it very easy to port something from Mac OSX to Linux). And finally, with modern cross-platform libraries, it is becoming more and more popular (especially with indy games) to just rely on those libraries for creating the games, and therefore, automatically getting a cross-platform game (Windows, Mac, Linux).

But don't get any illusions, Linux is not the OS for gamers. At least, not right now.

3.Does it boots fast.

Linux (of any distro) will generally boot very very fast compared to other systems like Windows or Mac. As for between distros, then the main determining factor is the desktop environment. There are many many distributions of Linux, but there are only a handful of desktop environments (the libraries that run all of the desktop graphics and other services). The two main ones are GNOME and KDE, and there are light-weight versions too like LXDE and XFCE. The heaviest desktop environment is KDE, which will take the longest to boot (still much faster than Windows, of course) and takes more resources than others, but I still prefer it because it is very responsive once it has booted. GNOME tends to be just a little less resource-intensive and a little less slow-booting than KDE. Then, LXDE and XFCE are much faster and don't require much resources, but also sacrifice features, of course.

I find that booting time is not a big factor for me in choosing a distro because they are all pretty fast. The main factor is how much resources they require ("minimum requirements") if I have an older computer. But with a recent and decent computer, there is no issue with this at all.

4.Does it look attractive like illustraion images.

Sure, that's a nice factor. I like KDE-based distributions because the visual appeal is nice, and if you don't like it, you can customize it endlessly to make it as nice as you want. For other desktop environments (like GNOME) you have to experiment with different distributions to see what you like best.

5.Does it runs on older machines.

If I have an older machine, then yes, that's the main factor. I use Lubuntu for this and I like it. Lubuntu will work great on a 10-year-old computer. But remember that Linux distros are very light-weight compared to, say, Windows. This means that a 5-year-old computer is probably going to run the latest and greatest Linux distribution very well. It's only in that 5-15 year-old time frame (roughly speaking) that you might consider one of those "light-weight" distributions like Lubuntu. For example, the laptop I run Lubuntu on is almost 8 years old, and it works like a charm.

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