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Last Post by jwenting
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That and two weeks I can make you an astrophysicist. Get real! This is not simple stuff, "give me all related things to the game developement"! Study, experiment, study some more, experiment some more, ...

And to become an astrophysicist you need 4 years for a BS, 2 more for an MS, and up to 6+ years for a PhD. My father was one, so I understand a bit of that. My wife is a particle physicist. After her BS, it took her 6 years to get her PhD at a top university, then another 10 years of post doctoral research before she got a permanent position on staff at a top international research laboratory.

To become a top game developer, it will take a similar amount of time. Don't give up. Just don't be impatient, and make small steps at first until you understand what you are doing. There is a lot of sources on the internet to help you, but until you actually start writing games and understanding the subtleties of the subject, anything else is just simple B.S.

Edited by rubberman

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FWIW, I don't mean to say that it will take you 15+ years to become a professional game developer. Just it will take that long to become one of the best. At the least, however, it will take you 4 or 5 years to learn enough to become employable in the industry. Equivalent to a BS degree. I have plenty of friends who did that, and went on to become top developers in that, or in many cases, other fields. Game programming and game theory expertise opens a lot of doors for the software engineer.

There are exceptions, but they are rare, geniuses that intuitively understand the domain. The fact that you asked the question(s) you did tell me you are not one of those. My grandson is. I am not. I am a top software engineer, but it took me a good 10 years to get "my chops" so to speak. My grandson makes me look like a doofus, and he is just 21 now. He was doing stuff I could only imagine when he was 8 or 10. This is a guy that builds his own CNC machines so he can mod his motorcycle... He then fixes bugs in some of the components he has to purchase, and sells the fixes for those back to the manufacturer. :-)

Edited by rubberman

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  1. Decide which platform you are going to major in. It's not hard to learn a new language; algorithms and techniques are mostly portable; but to be good at games you need to understand the actual API/graphics tools in all their horrible detail with all their horrible quirks and work-arounds.
  2. Write lots of code. Then write some more. Get someone who knows to critque it, then re-write it. Do not ever leave out bits that look hard or tedious (eg error handling and recovery) - these are the bits where expertise matters.
  3. After that you could try to join an open-source project to get experience of a real team developing a real program.

I agree with rubberman - expect this to take several years.

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http://norvig.com/21-days.html mandatory reading for anyone expecting to learn a programming profession in next to no time.

To any professional developer who's spent years or decades learning his craft, the attitude that it should only take a few days and watching some youtube videos to gain the same skills for an average person is nothing short of an insult.

This topic has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.
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