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I recently downloaded the beta version of Windows Live Mail Desktop, and I've got a problem. Whenever I try to login, it appears, then exits without even a warning message. When I try to log into my messenger account, then a window pops up that reads,

"MSN Passport Verification Failed with error 8: Not enough storage is available to process this command."

Is this really because of lack of storage? If so, I would appreciate some advice on how to increase my hard disk storage. If not, then I would also appreciate any info on what might really be causing this to not work.

Thanks,
lol_hacker101 :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

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Last Post by John A
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How much hard drive space do you have available? Anything < 1 GB is not good, and you should seek about increasing your hard drive space. Ways to get more space:

  • Defragment the hard drive. After time, pieces of files end up in many different parts of the hard drive, which ends up taking up more space on the hard drive, and the amount of free space can possibly get reported incorrectly. Try running Disk Defragment.
  • Empty the Windows Recycle Bin. If it hasn't been emptied in a while, a lot of files can build up and take up precious hard drive sapce.
  • Run a disk cleanup. It deletes temporary files which should have been deleted earlier, but didn't. Open My Computer, and right click on the hard drive icon. Under "Tools", choose the Disk Cleanup option.
  • Do your own clean up. You can either delete files you longer use/need, or in extreme cases you can backup the hard drive and reformat and reinstall. Most users will find that this brings more space.
  • And lastly, as a last resort, you can buy a new hard drive. IDE hard drives are relatively cheap, so buying a new one isn't much of a stretch. Make sure to get one with at least 250 GB of storage (usually you can get them for a little bit more than $100).

Hope this helps

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If your HD is formated to NTFS, you can:

- rightclick your drive in windows explorer and select "proprieties"
- check "compress drive to save disk space" checkbox and click "OK" button
- confirm that you want to compress subfolders too
- when prompted to skip files that are currently being used, click on the "No to all" (or "skip all") button. This will not happen immediately after procedure starts.

In about 1/2 h (depends on your HD size), the process should be finished. This will give you up to 50% increase of drive's capacity. Good thing to do after that would be defragmenting the drive (rightclick on the drive/proprieties/"Tools" tab/"Defragment Now..." button).

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If your HD is formated to NTFS, you can:

- rightclick your drive in windows explorer and select "proprieties"
- check "compress drive to save disk space" checkbox and click "OK" button
- confirm that you want to compress subfolders too
- when prompted to skip files that are currently being used, click on the "No to all" (or "skip all") button. This will not happen immediately after procedure starts.

In about 1/2 h (depends on your HD size), the process should be finished. This will give you up to 50% increase of drive's capacity. Good thing to do after that would be defragmenting the drive (rightclick on the drive/proprieties/"Tools" tab/"Defragment Now..." button).

You can also compress FAT32 formatted volumes by using Disk Compression Utility (I think that's what it's called); I'm not sure how much more space you get from doing that as compared to NTFS, but I think it's similar.

Several things to keep in mind with a compressed volume, though:

Compressed volumes are slower. If you are playing high-performance games, there will be noticeable slowdown. Hard-drive intensive tasks will also be affected.

The operating system has a harder time reporting free space. This isn't a problem when the hard disk is only about half-full, but when it begins to reach the hard drive's full capacity, often the computer will misreport free space, and installations of some programs might be halted in the middle because the computer suddenly runs out of free space.

However, compressed volumes are an effective way to create more free space without forking out cash.

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Nope, FAT32 doesn't support any disk compression. (atleast, none that I've heard about)
FAT16 does (2 GB partition limit), but none of the NT based OSes (Windows XP, NT and so) would be able access nor compress them.

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Nope, FAT32 doesn't support any disk compression. (atleast, none that I've heard about)
FAT16 does (2 GB partition limit), but none of the NT based OSes (Windows XP, NT and so) would be able access nor compress them.

Ah yes, you're right about that. Although DriveSpace is included with Windows 98, it refuses to compress any Fat32-formatted volumes. However, most Windows XP installations use NTFS as their filesystem. Also, if you're using Windows XP and have a Fat32-formatted partition, you can convert it to NTFS, allowing drive compression.

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