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I just came across a thread in one of my linkedin groups asking if anyone had participated in a 4-week, online course in getting the most our of social media. There is a panel of experts teaching the class and they refer to it as a university. I will not give the url because I do not want to give them a plug. Why? Because I am dubious of offers like these. If you want to find them search on the terms social media, university and magic and you will find them. Read the outline and let me know what you think and if you would pay (or if you think you could convince your company to pay) $797 for you to participate.

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Last Post by MktgRob
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No, I would absolutely not pay for something that vague. If the class was an exhaustive course that was practically guaranteed to be able to help you build an online community, then it MIGHT be worth that. But still probably not.

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Ha.. i see these all the time... "panel of experts" put together a class and charge a premium fee to attend. The premium fee actually increases the perceived value of the class - so there are some people that wind up paying... Tho - it's usually only a small classroom full of people. It ain't no university :P

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Ha.. i see these all the time... "panel of experts" put together a class and charge a premium fee to attend. The premium fee actually increases the perceived value of the class - so there are some people that wind up paying... Tho - it's usually only a small classroom full of people. It ain't no university :P

In this case the classroom is virtual as it is a web-based university.

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To be honest, I dont think this class will be no different than reading the blogs of these experts, keeping up with various sites like CNET and Mashable, and best of all, you save the money! The "experts" will probably regurgitate the same information from their blogs.

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To be honest, I dont think this class will be no different than reading the blogs of these experts, keeping up with various sites like CNET and Mashable, and best of all, you save the money! The "experts" will probably regurgitate the same information from their blogs.

Exactly my thought. I have been suckered in on things like this in the past (thankfully at no cost to myself but to the company I worked for) and they often come of as more of a sales pitch for additional classes and services in the end. Besides, I prefer self-educating myself because I am certain of the teacher's brilliance!:D

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