I want to increase my intagram followers, please suggest some reliable website or vendor details.

ailerons commented: I would prefer to go with Instagram ads to target relevant audience and followers +0

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Try BlackHatWorld.com

It's a super popular marketplace for this kinda thing.

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Buying Instagram followers is pretty much the same unethical tactic as buying up copies of your own book to get on the best seller's list. It's dodgy at best and contemptible at worst. At least The Times identifies (although not obviously) best sellers that resulted from bulk sales. Too bad …

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I disagree. Buying instagram followers is not unethical. In the world of marketing, sometimes it's important to fake it until ya make it. If that means paying to appear popular while you're working behind the scenes to actually get popular, then what's the harm?

Buying instagram or twitter followers is …

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Buying followers will not make you more popular. However, it’s a way to portray yourself to others to be more popular than you already are. It’s then up to you to use that benefit within your marketing technique to the fullest.

Similarly, no one wants to participate in an …

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Try BlackHatWorld.com

It's a super popular marketplace for this kinda thing.

Buying Instagram followers is pretty much the same unethical tactic as buying up copies of your own book to get on the best seller's list. It's dodgy at best and contemptible at worst. At least The Times identifies (although not obviously) best sellers that resulted from bulk sales. Too bad Instagram et al don't do the same.

commented: "Adult non-fiction, however, was down by 13%, as readers sought solace in imaginary worlds." - Imagine that. +15

I disagree. Buying instagram followers is not unethical. In the world of marketing, sometimes it's important to fake it until ya make it. If that means paying to appear popular while you're working behind the scenes to actually get popular, then what's the harm?

Buying instagram or twitter followers is not for every business. You aren't actually going to gain any real customers or any real popularity when you buy social followers. But you will gain the appearance of being popular at the surface, which can have some immediate benefits depending on what your goals are.

If you were just in your first season of a reality show on E! TV, it can harm your brand, and the TV show ratings, if at first glance it looks like the only people who care about what you have to say are your parents and your estranged uncle. In such a case, E! might choose to purchase followers for its rising stars so that it looks like the TV show is following people that peole care about. Millions of dollars of advertising revenue could be riding on spending $500 for some quick illusion.

The marketing industry is a big strategy game, and that's one of the biggest things that drew me to it in the first place.

Buying instagram followers is not unethical.

You can't imagine how much that disturbs me. While this may appear harmless in regards to, for example, some Reality TV nonsense it becomes dangerous when someone on Twitter who is spewing toxic opinions claims millions of followers who are in reality purchased bots. These opinions are given much more weight and traction than they deserve and can lead to tragic consequences. There are others who share those views and feel more free to express them and act on them if they think they are widely held. Unfortunately there are too many people who are unable or unwilling to evaluate an idea on its own merits.

There was a time, long before the internet and social media, when someone got up on a podium and spouted dangerous opinions and false "facts" while stooges in the crowd wandered about saying things like "He's right, you know." How is this different from Twitter bots, fake Facebook/Instagram followers, and astroturfing?

Jim,

This is a digital marketing forum. A guy asked in a digital marketing forum for some information about a promotional technique commonly used to appear as a larger brand than you actually are. It's the goal of just about every advertising and marketing agency in the world to do whatever is within their power to ensure that the companies and brands they represent appear bigger than they actually are, smarter than they actually are, more impressive than they actually are, loved by customers more than they actually are, etc.

There was a time, long before the internet and social media, when someone got up on a podium and spouted dangerous opinions and false "facts" while stooges in the crowd wandered about saying things like "He's right, you know." How is this different from Twitter bots, fake Facebook/Instagram followers, and astroturfing?

I actually take a little bit of offense to what you're saying because what I'm hearing from you is that appearances are everything.

In other words, how dare that radical be wearing a power suit! How dare that tailor sell him something that makes him appear more impressive and powerful than he actually is!? Now people are going to take him seriously, looking all polished like that, and that will lead to tragic consequences! Companies who sell items that make people appear powerful to people whose beliefs I disagree with disturbs me!

It's dangerous for idiots to appear like they know what they're talking about because then every Tom, Dick, and Harry will obviously automatically believe what they're saying.

Companies who sell items that make reality TV stars appear influential is just harmless nonsense. If a brand believes faked Twitter numbers and gives the wannabe social influencer a million dollars to promote their brand when they really don't have much influence at all, it's the fault of the brand to not have done smarter business and done their due diligence.

Let's take DaniWeb for a moment. There's a bit of a chicken and egg problem in that no one is interested in joining or being a part of a dead community. If the site is super active, people want to be a part of it. They don't want the fear of missing out. They want to participate because waht they write will get seen by lots of other people all over the world. If the site appears dead, no one wants to take their time to contribute content that no one will see or respond to.

That being said, how would you feel about DaniWeb paying for content writers to produce lots of forum posts to make the site appear super busy? New members will see the site is super busy, and so they'll want to be a part of it and sign up and start joining in. Let's say we started with 10 actual members and paid 50 content writers. The next thing you know, those 50 staff writers making the site seem like it had more members than it actually did have encouraged 10,000 members to join in and start engaging with each other.

This is a clear case of fake it till ya make it. Is it unethical because those 50 content writers were ONLY there because they were being paid to be? In a way, they infiltrated an organic community of people who genuinely care. As a member, how offended and distrubed would you be to know that you signed up 10 years ago only because the site appeared more popular than it really was at the time?

Or would you feel as if just because it seemed popular, that's not what kept you here for 10 years. Popularity might have been the initial attraction, but you stayed because you got enjoyment out of it, you made friends, you grew to care about the community and the site.

How is that any different than hearing someone out because they are well-groomed and wearing an expensive suit, and then making up your own mind based on what they have to say?

Or how is that any different than following a Twitter feed because it seems really popular about and it's about a topic that you're interested in, and then reevaluating and unfollowing when you find it more boring than you were expecting?

Again, this is a digital marketing and advertising forum. Please think about context. I actually take offense to you declaring, within this digital marketing and advertising forum, that any discussion about working towards making your product or service appear as if people love it, even if you're really struggling behind the scenes to bring it to fruition, is completely unethical and disturbing.

I just want to add that I get that not all advertising is always acceptable. Advertising can be deceptive. But it doesn't have to be. And I don't think that any big company in the world would exist if they didn't fake it until they made it when they were first starting out. What entrepreneur hasn't walked into an investor's meeting and inflated the numbers a little bit? Or spun the data to make it seem like they were doing better than they actually were?

The fact that it is commonly used does not make it ethical. It just makes it normalized. One of our biggest problems today is that previously unethical behaviour has become normalized. We used to have laws governing advertising that made false claims illegal. Movie studios have been successfully sued when it was revealed that some of the critics giving rave reviews were actually paid employees.

It's the goal of just about every advertising and marketing agency in the world to do whatever is within their power to ensure that the companies and brands they represent appear bigger than they actually are, smarter than they actually are, more impressive than they actually are, loved by customers more than they actually are, etc.

Yes. This is called lying.

how dare that radical be wearing a power suit!

Wearing a bespoke suit to make a good impression is not the same thing as claiming you have a million followers when in reality you only have a thousand. Showing the best version of yourself is not the same thing as showing a false version of yourself. Posting a ten year old photo of yourself (or a photo of someone else) on a dating site is just wrong.

Would you go into a job interview claiming you had skills that you lacked? How is that ethical?

If people want to make assumptions based on how you look then that's their failing. If they make assumptions based on lies that you tell then that's on you (and them, based on how outrageous the lies).

Having Michael Jordan endorse your sneakers is not false advertising. Saying the sneakers make you a Michael Jordan league athlete is.

how would you feel about DaniWeb paying for content writers to produce lots of forum posts to make the site appear super busy?

If you pay enough people to produce enough quality content then you are not making the site "appear" busy. It "is" busy, and it may attract enough people to consume that content. Creating a bot that automatically creates new users to inflate your member stats would be, IMO, unethical. Paying people to ask questions that they, in turn (under another username) answer is also unethical.

Is it unethical because those 50 content writers were ONLY there because they were being paid to be?

No. Paid or not, they are members and are contributing.

how offended and disturbed would you be to know that you signed up 10 years ago only because the site appeared more popular than it really was at the time?

I didn't sign up based on how popular I perceived the site to be. I signed up because I got the help I was looking for and I wanted to give back. I stuck around because I enjoyed the interaction and I felt I was making a positive contribution. The popularity of the site did not enter into it. If it did then I wouldn't still be here.

How is that any different than hearing someone out because they are well-groomed and wearing an expensive suit, and then making up your own mind based on what they have to say?

I make up my mind based on what they have to say, not on how many followers they have or how many likes they have received. If someone is spouting nonsense I don't care how well dressed he/she is.

Or how is that any different than following a Twitter feed because it seems really popular about and it's about a topic that you're interested in, and then reevaluating and unfollowing when you find it more boring than you were expecting?

Again, I don't make my decisions based on what is popular, especially knowing that "popularity" is basically (because of Twitter bots, etc.) bullshit. BTW, I don't follow anyone on Twitter.

I actually take offense to you declaring, within this digital marketing and advertising forum, that any discussion about working towards making your product or service appear as if people love it, even if you're really struggling behind the scenes to bring it to fruition, is completely unethical and disturbing.

You are certainly allowed to be offended. But if we accept that it is ok to make false claims about the popularity of products and/or services, knowing that these claims are likely bogus, then what use is popularity as a measuring stick? You are taking us back to the days of the travelling medicine shows with snake oil salesmen.

You may recall (maybe this was before you were born) the old "nine out of ten dentists recommend Colgate". Sounds impressive but you don't see this sort of claim much any more. Turns out the actual question put to dentists was "what five toothpaste brands would you recommend?" As long as nine out of ten dentists had Colgate somewhere on their list the advertisers could make their claim. But the claim was in reality "nine out of ten dentists recommend toothpaste".

So there you have a claim that was basically rendered nonsensical. This is what has happened to "popularity". It has become a meaningless measuring stick.

I dunno, Jim. The reason I took offense was because of context.

Basically it seems as if a new member posted in the digital marketing forum asking a question about, for lack of a better term, a technique that has been normalized.

We’re in an advertising forum, having a discussion about advertising, and you came into our house and berated the new member citing your reasoning because you find advertising largely unethical.

That would be akin to you signing up in a C++ forum, and asking a question about a technique that is common, although perhaps hacky in that you’re using a library not in the way it was initially designed, but instead in a way that it has come to been used for over the years. It’s not against the TOS or copyright rules of the library to use it in the way you are. It just wasn’t what the library was designed for.

Suddenly someone who is not in your industry at all, and has no programming experience, comes in and personally calls you an unethical person and a disgrace for using things not the way they were initially intended, citing their reason as because ten years ago their mother fell off a chair trying to use it as a step stool to reach a top shelf, and she permanently injured herself. And so now, anyone who publicly promotes using things not in the way they were designed is an unethical person.

In other words, expect offense to be taken when you enter an advertising forum and interrupt discussion to spew your distaste for the advertising industry.

I think you misunderstood where I am was coming from so let me clarify. I absolutely am not offended by your personal opinions on the advertising industry, any part of the advertising industry, or your definition of what constitutes ethical advertising.

I took offense to you hijacking the OP's question with your views. I'm offended because you did the digital equivalent of crashing an advertising conference and holding up picket signs protesting the ethics of the topics being discussed at the conference. Your views, in this instance, are unsolicited. If you wanted to express your views about the ad industry, it's best done as a new topic, pointing out your reasoning, and asking for an intelligent debate and discussion to follow. Hijacking someone's thread in an advertising forum asking about a perfectly normalized (that's the word to use, according to you) technique to tell them that they're unethical is unappreciated and unsolicited. They didn't invent the technique.

I will agree that I could have started another thread if I wished to discuss this at length. I didn't realize that this would explode to the extent that it did. I'll start a new thread with a back reference to this one and continue there (if you are interested). You and I are from different generations and may not find common ground here.

My apologies for hijacking this thread.

And how buying followers can help to improve your account? it will get more visible or how?

Buying followers will not make you more popular. However, it’s a way to portray yourself to others to be more popular than you already are. It’s then up to you to use that benefit within your marketing technique to the fullest.

Similarly, no one wants to participate in an empty forum. If you come here and the site appears dead, every visitor paid for with marketing efforts will leave and will be a waste of marketing budget.

But if you come to what appears to be a thriving site, you want to be a part of it. Your market budget immediately stretches much farther.

commented: Why does this make me think about the current POTUS? I wish it didn't. +15

I would prefer to go with Instagram ads to target relevant audience and followers

I know its really hard to increase the followers of Instagram since there is no option in Facebook/Instagram Advertisement dashboard.
I have tried increasing followers by doing Website click Facebook campaign to Instagram profile but results are very lame.

I have been looking for answers for this on other forums also but as Dani mentioned in first reply. Blackhatworld has some vendors who provide followers. And let me tell you those are not just bot, fake followers. While they add followers count to your profile their followers real and active people (some).

There are lots of SMM panels available on the internet who can easily give you that in cheap rates. Here is one of them I have used in past - wezore.com (Sorry If I am not allowed to post website here, please remove if required.)

Cheers!!

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