11
Contributors
29
Replies
30
Views
9 Years
Discussion Span
Last Post by Lawlercaust
0

Agree with bbqchickenrobot. I've seen the Gigabyte Motherboad M57SLI-DS4 running with 16GB of RAM with the BIOS upgraded on Windows x64 SP2.

0

Sure as long as you get the configuration (hardware, i.e. - motherboard and individual RAM modules + sizes) right and you're running the 64-bit version of the OS

http://blogs.zdnet.com/Bott/?p=37
http://www.vistaclues.com/reader-question-32-bit-vista-memory-limits/

Do you really need that much memory on a Vista workstation? Curious to what you are doing ... rendering perhaps?

RAM is very cheap and can make the difference between a turtle pc and a rocket pc, and I play many games. Also, i want the most future proof configuration out there.

0

for crysis to run well you need 2 gb + (the 64 bit version of the game client will use up to 8gb but needs vista x64)

0

For Crisis I'd recommend a 64bit OS with at least 4GB RAM (something i don't have yet). But if I had 16GB, i could use 8gb for crisis and 8gb for background apps.

0

yeah the 32 bit version of the game can use max 2gb for the game, its more on the 64 bit game client (i think 8gb)

0

who runs vista x64 right now, i want to know if it can run most hardware smoothly now, so i can start playing advanced games like crysis. My friend runs a 32 bit os with 2gb and plays crisis, and even with a 320mb video card, he can only get about 30 fps @1024*768 Medium. He upgraded to 4gb, but his pc only recognized 2.6gb.

0

32-bit systems are 4GB max, minus the memory used for your graphics card... + some other stuff... so that's about right.

If you want 4GB or more... go 64-bit.

0

isn't there 32-bit emulation in vista? WOW i believe... Doesn't AMD provide this option via it's processors as well? Don't know about intel... anyhow - you canemulate 32-bit for all your other apps and run your crysis game in true 64-bit mode...


with 16GB or RAM. lol.

0

64-bit Vista and 64-bit XP can take 128 GB of RAM!! And Microsoft wants to increase that dramatically! So 16 GB is an awful lot right now, but not for long—just like 512 MB of RAM was HUGE such a short time ago.

It's when you imagine x64 using what seem like gigantic RAM GBs that you get the picture why everything is going to x64. As long as we're still using just a few gigs of RAM, x64 seems like just a sort of silly trend. But x32 has places to go & people to see around the 3 GB mark, it's designed that way—so it's not seeing anything above 3 GB because it's got other commitments.

The GA mbs that support 16 GB of RAM are going to have their moment in the sun.

0

now it is possible!!! get an ecs 780g board and 4 4gb ram modules (corsair) from newegg.com and you've got your self a 16gb ram system. the ram costs 300.00 per 4gb stick.

0

Seriously... you won't need 16GB's of RAM for anything other than bragging to your buds. That's for home use of course. If you are running server stuff, then you can find other boards that will take care of this for your.

For home usage - 4 - 8 Gigs is enough I can run Crysis without a prob on 2 gigs, but I have 4 and will eventually consider the upgrade to 8GB in case of running multiple memory intense progs simultaneously with my Quad processor.

I just built a new system - the "spider" platform from AMD:

AMD Phenom X4 9850 Black Edition OC'd to 3.0 Ghz (air cooled)
4GB Corsair Dominator 1066 DDR2 (PC8500) RAM (4 x 1GB)
1 WD Raptor 75GB 10,000 RPM HDD (boot drive)
2 WD 500 GB HDD (Non-Raid)
2 Sapphire Radeon 3870 512MB DDR4 Graphics Card (Crossfired)
ASUS M3A32-MVP Delux WiFi Motherboard (790 chipset)
CoolerMaster 850W Power Supply
Windows Vista Ultimate 64-bit

This thing handles anything thrown at it.... for cheap too ;) The motherboard is for advanced builders and can give a little bit of trouble. You have to sort of coerce it to do what you want it to, but once it's running - it's a great board.

0

i know, i was just letting everyone know that it was possible. who the #ell would need 16gb ram anyway, it won't be used by programs anyway.

0

now here's another question. is there a noticable difference between 1066mhz ram, 800mhz ram, 667, 1142, etc for ddr2. what about 1066,1333,1600,1866,2066, etc for ddr3. there are so many speeds to choose from. is there a benefit to get higher speed ddr2. what about hi speed ddr2 (1142mhz) vs low speed ddr3 (1066). Thanks for those who can help.

0

This depends on your hardware. The short answer - yes, there is a difference. As long as you can keep a 1:1 ratio on the FSB you will be cool.

DDR3 can be faster depending on the speed it is set to. If it's lower speed than DDR2 then obviosly, not gonna be faster. I believe DDR3 will allow for faster speeds without overclocking and without tons of heat being generated. That's it.

DDR2 should be cheaper and I believe is the only type compatible with AMD AM2/AM2+ boards and CPU's.... DDR3 probably won't be available until later on this year for AMD.
Not an Intel guy so I don't know if DDR3 is there yet, but I think I heard/read it was.

0

Basically you can think of it like this: DDR3 = DDR2 at higher performing speeds w/o overclocking and less heat (which is ultimate due to less Voltage). Voltage is what you use to overclock... so my DDR2 1066 uses a voltage of 2.2. While DDR3 1066 uses a voltage of ~1.5 - much lower. And less heat and power consumption. Also, DDR3 operates at a higher latency which may result in slower performance when compared to DDR2 of same speed. Technically they should perform the same and have the same bandwidth, but the latency is lower.

DDR3 compensates for this by obtaining higher clock speeds than DDR2 at a lower voltage (without overclocking) so ultimately, on the highend, will out perform DDR2.

Check out these two links:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ddr3
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DDR2_SDRAM

0

I think the difference in the builder/user has to measured along with the difference in the RAM. I am putting my first build together, mainly watching NCIX sales (I can walk to their store) and buying bits and pieces one by one, very slowly.

RAM was a troublesome thing, because the mobo makers and the RAM makers don't keep up with the myriad combinations possible. You can go according to the "safe" lists, but they don't show much. I am taking the advice of my fellow at the store, and risking 1000 on my machine. I could have been safer at 800, but the price was good (actually the same for either) and my RAM will be a bit better, if I can get away with it.

For somebody experienced, this would be easy. The NCIX store fellow seems good, and he emphasized that he's "sure" my chances are better than 99%. Actually I'm just about as "sure" that he's right. But it's a dicy thing when you really don't know what you're doing.

But then, so is building a computer a bit dicy. I could have just walked into a store and bought one, and it might have been cheaper, if anything. But. . . .

So I'd factor a bit of that into purchasing decisions about RAM. I'd call it the "Depends if you're up to it" factor. Good luck.

0

which is better to get, a ddr2 mobo or a ddr3 mobo. also, what's the 1:1 fsb ratio thing, i never overclocked before.

0

RAM is very cheap and can make the difference between a turtle pc and a rocket pc, and I play many games. Also, i want the most future proof configuration out there.

Well, depends on what you consider cheap....to fill 4 slots with 4GB of memory each will cost you ~$1,000 or more.
If gaming is your thing, then you're much better off dropping your cash on the best video card you can afford.
If future-proofing is your thing, then wait 2-3 months for the Nehalem processor to come out, then you'll be king of the world and get hot chicks.

But at any rate, assuming you can afford to get 16GB RAM installed (I know I can't :( ) it's still not a good idea because A) It will put an insane load on your memory controller and B) you'll probably never use even a quarter of it, so you'd be wasting not just a lot of money, but also system resources (I feel sorry for your PSU!) and also C) If you ever decide to overclock with this rig, having four 4GB sticks will handicap you...

0

I found out that newegg.com has some 16b RAM kits for $1049 USD!!! D@mn, that's a lot of money. Gigabyte and some ECS boards support 16gb, but wasn't tested by the manufacturer themselves. I would imagine small and medium businesses would need the 16gb for their self-built servers, or someone who has several virtual machines and wants to give 2 or 3 gigs of ram to each one. Right now, i don't know of any other application that supports 16gb, so i guess it's wasted ram :(

Lucky for me, i'm not even considering 16gb , and even my future high end gaming rig won't have any more than 8gb.

0

$1049 ??jeepers.give me alot of alcohol and drug me against my will,and then give me my bank card.Thats the only way Ill buy 16gb.
I think Ill wait for the future
16gb to do what with
anyways good info.

Ive been in the trade for a long time and never bothered to overclock.wonder why, guess I just buy new cpu's and RAM on the companies expense...Im so wrong

0

Intel QX6850
4G Corsair DDR3 ram
Asus P5E3
Dual BFG 8800 OC with SLI
2 WD 500G 7200RPM SATA HDD
1kilowatt PSU
and enough fans to make it fly

everything upgradable to 64bit and i can go up to 8G of ram

There is your future proofing. that computer will last me till i die

0

well i m use 521 ram on a single motherboard
so why not u

There is a BIG difference between 512Mb and 16Gigs of ram.

can any one else understand what this guy is saying?

English Man!!!! Use English!!

-1

I run 36 gb on my system:icon_mrgreen:

Votes + Comments
18 months late, and without any other details of your system, your post is utterly meaningless.
This topic has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.
Have something to contribute to this discussion? Please be thoughtful, detailed and courteous, and be sure to adhere to our posting rules.