0

I just want to overclock my amd 64 to 2.4 just to see how it would perfrom, how do i do this in bios?

if I overclock my FBs frequency do I need to increase the agp frequency as well?

5
Contributors
11
Replies
12
Views
12 Years
Discussion Span
Last Post by szukalski
0

How do you want to do it? Do you want to overclock your RAM as well?
You are going to have to raise your HTT/FSB to achieve a higher clock speed.
With a multiplier of 11, you would need to raise the HTT to 218 to achieve your goal of ~2.4GHz (218x11=2398).
If you leave your memory running at 1:1, then it will run at 218MHz as well, this means you will overclock your RAM as well as your memory. This is ideal, since you don't make any compromises by running a divider, but if your RAM can't run that fast, or if you don't want to give it any more voltage, or don't want to overclock your RAM, then you will need to run it at a divider.
If you are running your HTT at 218MHz, then to keep your RAM running close to 200MHz, then you will need to run your RAM divider at 180 (9:10), effectively running your RAM at ~196MHz (218 x 0.9 = 196.2).
Running with a divider other than 200 (1:1) means that your cpu will be running at 2.4GHz, but your overall system won't be optimal; you'll probably see an increase in math computations, but will probably see a decrease in memory bandwidth.
Decide whether you want to overclock your RAM, it's a little more complicated, but yields the best results.

0

Remember, overclocking is very dangerous, it can easily fry your CPU in 10 seconds. Please make sure you know exactly what you are going to do, and know what warning signs to look out for before you even start the overclock. You could even buy an older system for cheap (or use your old one if your willing to mess it up) and practice overclocking it.

0

K I overclocked the fsb to 205 and the agp to 67, when I went to system info in XP it says amd system build ,etc ~MHz2410 thats 2.4Ghz right?

well I got a 15fps increase in HL2, not bad, i already set it back to default

0

Remember, overclocking is very dangerous, it can easily fry your CPU in 10 seconds. Please make sure you know exactly what you are going to do, and know what warning signs to look out for before you even start the overclock. You could even buy an older system for cheap (or use your old one if your willing to mess it up) and practice overclocking it.

It's not THAT dangerous if you do it properly and don't raise your voltages.
Finding your maximum HTT/RAM/CPU speeds on stock voltages should be pretty safe, provided you do them one at a time and increase the speeds in small, regular, intervals. If the component ain't working at a certain setting, odds are it needs more voltage. You usually risk frying something when pushing components to their limits and giving them more voltage than what they're designed to run at (or what they're able to withstand). This creates more heat than what the component is designed for and a meltdown occurs, hence the need for efficient cooling.
Don't get me wrong, there's always a risk you run when overclocking, but as with all things, knowledge is power, and power is safety. (Or the impression of being safe at least, perception becoming reality...)
Tha major problem is people playing with things they don't understand and not paying heed to temps/stability issues. Knowledge is power, but power does not imply knowledge.

0

how far up can you push your voltages and not fry them? I've moved my proc voltage up 2 notches, and my ram voltage up 1

0

Depends on your cooling.
I've seen people giving their cpu's 2 volts on some radical cooling, but I would NOT recommend it myself. If you have a A64 on air cooling, I'd say 1.65v would be the upper limit, maybe 1.70v if you have decent flow. Check your temps and make sure you're not hitting past 55 degrees C at peak and you should be right.
Are you pushing your voltages because you're failing stress testing? Or just to see what it does?
The ram voltage will depend on the type of your ram.
If your ram chips are BH-5, they'll take more than what your motherboard can probably give. 3.1v on BH-5 is pretty common.
If your ram is TCCD, 2.8-2.9v is all you need to give them to get the best performance.
And UTT chips (used in OCZ VX) are similar to BH-5 in terms of voltage.

0

Best rule to follow:

If a component won't run stable without increasing voltages, you've overclocked further than it can handle!

Beyond that point, don't overclock unless you can afford to throw the component in the bin and replace it with a new one!

0

Best rule to follow:

If a component won't run stable without increasing voltages, you've overclocked further than it can handle!

Beyond that point, don't overclock unless you can afford to throw the component in the bin and replace it with a new one!

Ha ha ha. Very good.

But you forgot the overclockers rule:

If you can't get the results you want. Blow it up trying.

Gives you an excuse to buy a better one. (Just keep the cash for this scenario handy..)

0

yeah, i pushed it up to 1.7v to get the fsb setting to boot into windows, but it wasn't stable, i crashed last night processing some vid editing, so I might bump it back down, and decrease the voltage to 1.65, it was hitting 56C at peak but we keep our house pretty cool most of the time. my ram's at 2.8, but i might bring it back to stock as well. It's more important for me to have a stable system than to be faster. I do alot of vid conversions and burning, and when it fails in the middle of that it's a pain. lol.

0

That's what all the testing is for Shadowgrip, no use having an overclocked system if it isn't stable.
You can go through and test each component's maximum stable limits before making a judgement on what your overclock will be.
ie. find max stable fsb, then max stable cpu clock, then max stable ram clock. (or any order that you so desire).

This topic has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.
Have something to contribute to this discussion? Please be thoughtful, detailed and courteous, and be sure to adhere to our posting rules.