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Hi all, I just upgraded a 5 year old HP Pavilion from 2-256 MB ram to a generic 2-512MB ram and had to reverse them in order to install alreadt a bad sign.

I statrted the PC the first time and nothing happen, I statrted it again and it did not go to windows XP, but instead asked me how I wanted to start my PC. Normally, last known config, safe mode, safe mode with networking and another safe mode option, I chose all but nothing happen it kept showing up the same screen, F1 for set up or F10 for system recovery.

Any hints on this problem or am I doomed with wrong memory upgrade? I thought the PC would automatically recgonize the hardware, but I think I got swindled unless someone has some suggestions on getting pass the how do you want to start your PC screen. Thanx everyone.

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Last Post by crunchie
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Have a look at the black and white BIOS POST screen when it boots, there is a memory checker there. If the PC is going to the start selection page, it means that at least some of the memory is being recognised.

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It sounds to me like you have put the wrong type of ram in. Put your old ram back in and go to www.crucial.com and use their scanner to find out what ram you have and what ram is compatible with your computer.

You can't just throw any old ram in to a PC, It has to be the right speed for it.

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Absolutely wrong!! Ram is only backwards compatible to a degree.
If it can use a maximum of 133mhz ram, 400mhz ram will throw up all kinds of errors and stop the machine from booting, which is what is happening.
I have worked on quite a few older Pavilions and a mix of ram speeds can cause big problems, even if they are only 33mhz apart.

Also, because of the cheapness of the motherboards, they are severely restricted on the size of the ram fitted. Quite a lot of the Pavilions made for XP cannot use more than 512meg total, 256 x2 can be the biggest option.

Pavilions are cheaply built.

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agree with Rik from RCE memories differs on frequency speed..consult hp tech support for the specs of your pc..

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Try resetting your bios first by removing the cmos battery on the motherboard. Leave it out for a couple of minutes, then put it back in. Make certain that the power is turned off at the wall first.

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Also have to agree with Rik... just because it fits doesn't mean it is compatible. Being that it is a 5yo machine, are likely looking at serious RAM limitations, both in terms of capacity limits and in terms of write-speed compatibility. If you can give us the model number, would be easy enough to look up the specs and give you an accurate guide as to both what type of RAM would be compatible, as well as how much your machine will actually accept.

Try resetting your bios first by removing the cmos battery on the motherboard. Leave it out for a couple of minutes, then put it back in. Make certain that the power is turned off at the wall first.

Please don't take this as a criticism, but am uncertain as to how this would help remedy a RAM-based issue... could you shine a little more light on this tip for us??

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had to reverse them in order to install alreadt a bad sign

is a clue that it is the wrong ram if you ask me.

A ram issue can sometimes be caused by the bios retaining timing settings from a previous ram installation so clearing the cmos can sometimes help, but not in this case I suspect.

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Please don't take this as a criticism, but am uncertain as to how this would help remedy a RAM-based issue... could you shine a little more light on this tip for us??

As Rik said. Different RAM has different timings and clearing the cmos is necessary. May not work in this case, but it is worth a try.
I have several different sets of RAM here that I use on my 939 system and when I swap them around, I have to clear the bios or it will not boot.
Is that light enough for you, or is there anything else you want to be critical about?

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Try resetting your bios first by removing the cmos battery on the motherboard. Leave it out for a couple of minutes, then put it back in. Make certain that the power is turned off at the wall first.

agree with this post, resetting BIOS do sometimes help...

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As Rik said. Different RAM has different timings and clearing the cmos is necessary. May not work in this case, but it is worth a try.
I have several different sets of RAM here that I use on my 939 system and when I swap them around, I have to clear the bios or it will not boot.
Is that light enough for you, or is there anything else you want to be critical about?

I did say was not being critical. Hadn't heard of this before (admittedly don't swap out RAM on a regular basis), so was interested enough to want some more info on the matter... not missing the chance to learn something new is all :)

Just out of curiosity, why is it you you have several sets of RAM for use on that system rather than just simply installing the highest package and leaving at that (again, not trying to be smart, but just interested to know if there is an advantage offered by this)?

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I have different RAM because the 939 system is now my toy. I enjoy overclocking it and having different RAM allows more flexibility.
I have one set of BH-5 RAM which will run 250MHz+ (DDR500) at 2-2-2-5 1T timings. Have another set of TCCD RAM that will run 310MHz (DDR620) on 3-3-3-6 1T timings.
It's all fun.

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