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My original CPU fan conked out so I had to order another, only they couldn't send me the exact same one again so I had to get something similar. The voltage, size and so forth appear to be the same. My concern is with the amps -- the original had 0.15 amps and the new replacement has 0.56 amps. Does anyone happen to know if this difference in amps will pose a problem of any sort (such as overheating)?

Please help me out. : ) Thank you.

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Last Post by puteruser2005
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Overheating won't be a problem; quite the opposite, I'd imagine. The Wattage rating of the new fan is almost 4 times that of the old one, so (assuming that the fan is efficient) that puppy should move a heck of a lot more air than the old one did. Being a "beefier" fan though, it might also be noisier than the old one.

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I'd suggest that, if you haven't already, to not hook that up to the motherboard, but to hook it up to an ATX power connector. A fan that big might draw too much current if it's using the spots included on the mobo for smaller fans.

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Thanks for lending a helping hand here.

DMR, I've heard that some types of fans are able to be super quiet even at high speeds. The original was a JMC/DaTech fan while the new fan is made by NMB. Would this brand be less noisy even though the amps are higher?

alc6379, what could happen if it did draw too much current?

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I'd suggest that, if you haven't already, to not hook that up to the motherboard, but to hook it up to an ATX power connector. A fan that big might draw too much current if it's using the spots included on the mobo for smaller fans.

Excellent point. :)
The connectors (and their associated circuit traces) on the motherboard are much more fragile that the power feeds coming directly from the supply, so excess current flow through the mobo connectors can damage them. If your fan is made to connect to the motherboard, you can buy an adapter to convert the fan's power connector to one which will mate with the power supply feeds.

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If your fan is made to connect to the motherboard, you can buy an adapter to convert the fan's power connector to one which will mate with the power supply feeds.

I'm not sure if my chassis cooling fan connects to the motherboard. Could you possibly take a peek at this and see if it does? I'd really appreciate it.

If it turns out that I need to connect it to a different spot, will I be able to pick up a working adaptor, being that the plugs on Dell fans are proprietary (specially wired)?

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I've heard that some types of fans are able to be super quiet even at high speeds...Would this brand be less noisy even though the amps are higher?

In general, some brands/models of fans are definitely quieter than other fans, as they are built with low noise in mind in addition to their cooling capability. NMB does make some fans with pretty low noise ratings, but you would have to compare the noise ratings of your particular models of fans to see if the new one is supposed to be any quieter than the old one.

If it turns out that I need to connect it to a different spot, will I be able to pick up a working adaptor, being that the plugs on Dell fans are proprietary (specially wired)?

The fan is meant to connect to the motherboard on that system, but nothing says that it has to. If you want to wire it right to the power supply but can't find an off-the-shelf adapter for the fan, it isn't a difficult job to rewire the fan with a connector that does fit the power supply.

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What I'm doing is somehow connecting the plug of the CPU fan to the power supply fan, is that right?

But if the fan isn't connected to the motherboard, the temperature sensing information won't be sent to the motherboard, will it?

Also, if the fan isn't connected to the fan connector on the system board, Dell won't be able to detect the fan and I'll get error messages, right?

What kind of adapter do I need?

Is there a tutorial you could supply that takes me through the steps I need to follow? (This will be my first time opening my computer, so I'm not sure what I'm doing.)

Thanks again.

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One thing about systems like this-- you still need to have a "tach", or RPM monitoring lead to connect to the motherboard connector. If not, your system will not boot, because it will think there's no CPU fan connected. And, of course, that's a no-no. :)

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I've seen wiring "hackarounds" for the whole "fan's power comes from the supply but motherboard needs to sense fan bla bla bla" hookups, but the actual wiring configuration depends on the particular motherboard, and honestly- I'm too tired to go Googling for that info right now. It's sleepy-time for Dave................................

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I've seen wiring "hackarounds" for the whole "fan's power comes from the supply but motherboard needs to sense fan bla bla bla" hookups, but the actual wiring configuration depends on the particular motherboard, and honestly- I'm too tired to go Googling for that info right now. It's sleepy-time for Dave................................

Let's just say I have some experience with this machine. All you need is the one lead for tach running-- the motherboard requires that line, so you're kind of stuck.

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Let's just say I have some experience with this machine. All you need is the one lead for tach running-- the motherboard requires that line, so you're kind of stuck.

lol So I'm stuck having to connect it to the motherboard. I'm glad you knew about that, it saved me from a lot of trouble.

Are there any signs I should look out for that would indicate that the high current is causing harm? Could it damage my motherboard?

What is with the Dell techs giving me a fan with such high amps... Argh. :( Perhaps Dell has other replacement fan models with lower amps. It doesn't sound like their techs agree about the harm of high currents, so hopefully they will agree to exchange.


I thank you both, very much.

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