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I'M trying to make the switch from Windows to Linux, or at least make it a 9 to 1 ratio. I mean, I can't completely do away with windows for several reasons. I'M also interested in programming. Now, Linux is suppose to be a much better OS and that seems to be the OS that most programmers prefer. But what I'M trying to figure out is, why is there so many different versions of the same program for so many different distributions? Doesn't that make it harder on the programmer? And I would think that programs should work on all of them anyway. I thought the different distributions just came loaded with different programs from the start and each distribution had a different GUI. Please explain. Thanks.

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Last Post by sknake
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>>But what I'M trying to figure out is, why is there so many different versions of the same program for so many different distributions?

Its no different than windows. How often does Flash, Windows, Adobe, etc prompt you for an update? Thats a different version. In Linux the version numbers are simply more apparent. Also the distros change a little bit of the program to best-fit their configuration model. Usually it doesn't change the functionality of the program, just how they are packaged and where the config files are stored.

>>I thought the different distributions just came loaded with different programs from the start and each distribution had a different GUI

Some come with a GUI, some don't. For the ones that do its also optional whether or not you want to install the GUI. What distro are you running? I would recommend Ubuntu if you're still trying out different versions, but give them all a shot and decide for yourself.

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