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I'm using a laptop with the Fedora os installed in a 30gb partition.........
How can I extend it to my hard disk's full capability(160 gb)................
I don't have root access.........
I'm using an account without administration privileges.........

Thanks in advance............

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Last Post by mike_2000_17
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If you don't have root access, an administrator's account, and are not in the sudoers list (/etc/sudoers) then you are not out of luck, but you are going to need to do several things to get access to the other 130GB of disc space. To do that you will need to

  1. Boot with a live or rescue CD/DVD/USB drive.
  2. Login as root.
  3. Edit the drive partition table with the fdisk command (fdisk /dev/sda) and create a new linux partition.
  4. Create a file system on that partition, such as ext3 or ext4, and give it a label such as "newdata-1".
  5. Mount the system root file system in a temporary location that you create, such as /mnt/oldroot.
  6. Create a mountpoint for your file system in /mnt/oldroot/mnt, such as /mnt/oldroot/mnt/newdata.
  7. Set the permissions on /mnt/oldroot/mnt/newdata to allow users and others full access, as in "chmod ugo+rwx /mnt/oldroot/mnt/newdata"
  8. Edit the file /mnt/oldroot/etc/fstab and add the new file system mount information, such as
LABEL=newdata-1 /mnt/newdata ext4 defaults 1 2

You might want to edit /mnt/oldroot/etc/sudoers and add yourself with all permissions so you can switch to root without knowing the root password. Then you can change the root password and become the new sysadmin. I assume that you have permission/authority to do all this? Anyway, at this point, you can reboot to the system hard drive and you should be in business. You can then create a link in your home directory to /mnt/newdata and drop whatever you want in there.

Votes + Comments
Very cool! Is that what they call kung-funix?
nice
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Thanks for your reply, but i'm a newbie. i'm not able to understand many terms...
anyhow, i have tried to try it...but couldn't succeed.....
how to create a linux partition and what do you mean by editing partition table?

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Let me elaborate:

  1. Boot with a live or rescue CD/DVD/USB drive.
    I think this is pretty straight forward, you find Live-CD from any distribution of Linux (or install CD), and when you boot from it, you don't go through installation (if available) but instead boot from the CD.

  2. Login as root.
    All LiveCDs will allow you to login as "root" (and refer to their website for the password, probably something like "root" or blank).

  3. Edit the drive partition table with the fdisk command (fdisk /dev/sda) and create a new linux partition.
    Once logged in, you open a terminal window (menu: System Tools -> Terminal). Then, you can run the command fdisk -l which will list the available hard-drives and partitions on the computer. Usually, the internal hard-drive will be called /dev/sda (and sdb, sdc, etc.). For each physical hard-drive, its partitions will be listed as /dev/sda1, /dev/sda2, etc. Now that you have this information, you can locate your harddrive and the partitions you wish to work with (delete, create, etc.). Note that information down (or copy-paste) for later reference. Then, you can launch fdisk /dev/sda to edit to partitions of the hard-drive /dev/sda (or whatever you identified as the correct hard-drive to edit). Then, you follow the on-screen instructions and possibly internet tutorials on using fdisk.

  4. Create a file system on that partition, such as ext3 or ext4, and give it a label such as "newdata-1".
    This is also part of the things you would do under fdisk (part of the previous step).

  5. Mount the system root file system in a temporary location that you create, such as /mnt/oldroot.
    Once you are done with fdisk and have your new partition ready and your know the identifier of your partition where the OS is installed (say it is called /dev/sda5), you change to the mount directory as by cd /mnt (or cd /media on some distros). Then, you create a new directory with mkdir oldroot, which will create a directory called "oldroot". Then, you mount the partition where the OS is installed onto that directory with a command like mount /dev/sda5 oldroot (or maybe mount -t ext3 /dev/sda5 oldroot, if /dev/sda5 is an EXT3 partition).

  6. Create a mountpoint for your file system in /mnt/oldroot/mnt, such as /mnt/oldroot/mnt/newdata.
    Same as before, you change the directory with cd /mnt/oldroot/mnt, which gets you into the "mount" directory of your installed operating system. Then, you create a new directory mkdir newdata.

  7. Set the permissions on /mnt/oldroot/mnt/newdata to allow users and others full access, as in "chmod ugo+rwx /mnt/oldroot/mnt/newdata"
    Remaining in the same directory (/mnt/oldroot/mnt), you simply write chmod a+rwx newdata.

  8. Edit the file /mnt/oldroot/etc/fstab and add the new file system mount information, such as
    LABEL=newdata-1 /mnt/newdata ext4 defaults 1 2
    This means that you go to the directory etc of your installed operating system, that is, you write cd /mnt/oldroot/etc and then you edit the file called "fstab" (which records the partitions to mount when the operating system boots up). To do that, you can use any text editor of your choice, for simple things like this, I like to use nano, in which case you can do nano fstab and add the line given above (or something else depending on your distro, on Ubuntu, it works better with "UUID=d4925sdf234 /media/oldroot ext4 defaults 0 0", where the UUID is something you get from fdisk or other tools that list the partitions). At this point, the next time you boot into your installed operating system, the new partition should get mounted automatically into that /mnt/newdata directory.

  9. You might want to edit /mnt/oldroot/etc/sudoers and add yourself with all permissions so you can switch to root without knowing the root password.
    This just means that while still in the LiveCD session (as root), go to the installed operating system's etc directory, that is, do cd /mnt/oldroot/etc. Then you edit the sudoers file with nano sudoers and add a line like username ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL for your username, this will grant your user account the possibiliy to issue sudo commands, which all you need to have full access.

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Ah Mike, going back to the department of redundancy department are we? :-) kewl!
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