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Is it possible to save an entire folder during a system reboot? I have some rather large applications that would be a hassle to download if I coudlnt save them. Is it possible to drag a program file into a special place to where it would be saved if I completely restarted my entire computer to factory settings?

Any help appreciated,
JT

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Last Post by Thong_Ispector
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Is it possible to save an entire folder during a system reboot? I have some rather large applications that would be a hassle to download if I coudlnt save them. Is it possible to drag a program file into a special place to where it would be saved if I completely restarted my entire computer to factory settings?

Any help appreciated,
JT

No ,unless you had you hard drive setup with 2 partitions ,first one with windows on it and the second for storage ,you could save it to the second partition ,because when you do a full restore of windows the partition with windows installed on it gets wiped clean .
you could get another hardrive and install it as a slave and copy the files to it ,and after you restore copy them back.

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The problem I see is that even if you were to create a second partition and copy the applications to it then do a reinstall you would not have working applications.
Data created by those applications can be saved.
For example: If you were to copy the program files folder to the second partition, reinstall then move the program files folder back to the main partition you would NOT have working applications. The installation process involves much more than placing the program files in one folder, they install DLL's in the system folder, They add entries into the System Registry etc...
All too often I will create a backup of a persons hard drive on a second partition to save their data only to get a call saying they found the program using explorer but they cannot run the program...
Again, I tell them they need to reinstall the original program in the current OS then they can use that program to read their data from the second partition.

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The problem I see is that even if you were to create a second partition and copy the applications to it then do a reinstall you would not have working applications.
Data created by those applications can be saved.
For example: If you were to copy the program files folder to the second partition, reinstall then move the program files folder back to the main partition you would NOT have working applications. The installation process involves much more than placing the program files in one folder, they install DLL's in the system folder, They add entries into the System Registry etc...
All too often I will create a backup of a persons hard drive on a second partition to save their data only to get a call saying they found the program using explorer but they cannot run the program...
Again, I tell them they need to reinstall the original program in the current OS then they can use that program to read their data from the second partition.

You are correct i missed that word "Applications " didn't take it to mean the program was already installed and running!! no can do!!LOL

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When I say applications, I really mean that I am a bastard and want to save all my music files. Unless saying the words "download" and "music" in the same sentence in here is not taboo! Then I mean applications.

Ive read hat you can save music files into the My Documents folder during a system restore and they are unharmed, so there is nothing like that for a total system blowout? :(

JT

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What do you use for your backups?
You can just save those "Applications" to a CD or DVD or network it to a buddys pc and store them over there. You can use partition magic to create a partition on your existing drive and move them to it before formatting your C drive. If your working with a desktop box you can borrow a spare drive from someone and set it up as a slave and copy your files to that...

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