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I am facing rather a piquant situation recently. Whenever I click a program icon on the desktop, instead of the program get executed, I get a small pop up window with the caption 'file download' security warning and asks whether to save the file or to cancel it? The program doesn't run instead occupies the CPU with high usage. How to get rid of this nuisance?
This problem is only selective. Can someone suggest how to resolve this issue.
Thanks

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Last Post by bravo21
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Method 1: you didn't tell what operationg system you use. ok Move the "Temporary Internet Files" folder back to its original location
To complete Method 1 on a Windows Vista-based computer, follow these steps:

1. Click Start type Internet Options in the Start Search box, and then click Internet Options in the Programs list.
2. On the General tab, click Settings in the Browsing History area.
3. Click Move Folder.
4. In the Please select a folder to which you can add items navigation pane, locate the following folder:
C:\Users\User_Account_Name\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows
5. Click OK two times.
6. When you are receive the following message, click Yes:
Windows will now log you off to finish moving Temporary Internet Files. Do you want to continue?
7. Log on to Windows Vista again.

To complete Method 1 on a Windows XP-based computer or on a Windows Server 2003-based computer, follow these steps:

1. Click Start, click Run, type inetcpl.cpl, and then click OK.
2. On the General tab, click Settings in the Browsing History area.
3. Click Move Folder.
4. In the Please select a folder to which you can add items navigation pane, locate the following folder:
C:\Documents and Settings\username\Local Settings
5. Click OK, click Apply, and then click OK.


Method 2: Grant permissions to the "Temporary Internet Files" folder
To complete Method 2 on a Windows Vista-based computer, follow these steps:

1. Click Start type Internet Options in the Start Search box, and then click Internet Options in the Programs list.
2. On the General tab, click Settings in the Browsing History area.
3. Click View Files. The "Temporary Internet Files" folder opens.
4. In the Windows Explorer address box, click the folder name that comes before Temporary Internet Files.
5. Click Organize, and then click Properties.
6. On the Security tab, click Edit.
7. In the Group or user names box, click the name of the affected user. If the name of the affected user is not listed, follow these steps:
1. Click Add.
2. In the Enter the object names to select box, type the name of the affected user, and then click OK.
3. In the Group or user names box, click the name of the affected user.
8. In the Permissions for User_Name box, click to select the Full Control check box under the Allow column.
9. Click Apply, and then click OK.
10. Close Windows Explorer.
11. Click OK two times.

To complete Method 2 on a Windows XP-based computer or on a Windows Server 2003-based computer, follow these steps:

1. Click Start, click Run, type inetcpl.cpl, and then click OK.
2. On the General tab, click Settings in the Browsing History area.
3. Click View Files.
4. In Windows Explorer, move to the folder that contains the "Temporary Internet Files" folder.
5. In the right-pane, right-click an empty area, and then click Properties.
6. On the Security tab, click the name of the affected user in the Group or user names box. If the name of the affected user is not listed, follow these steps:
1. Click Add.
2. In the Enter the object names to select box, type the name of the affected user, and then click OK.
3. In the Group or user names box, click the name of the affected user.
7. In the Permissions for User_Name box, click to select the Full Control check box under the Allow column.
8. Click Apply, and then click OK.
9. Close Windows Explorer.
10. Click OK two times.

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