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If all computers are on a network sharing the same network name. The only group or userName I can assign to the network is; everyone. How can I give each computer it's own unique name that is only specific within the Share permissions for a Group or Username ?

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Last Post by rproffitt
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  • Not mundane at all. OSes, file systems, ownership, rights have a long history. My background goes from no file system OSes like what we had on old computers like GE-210 (dating myself) to CP/M, DOS, Novell, VAX VMS, UNIX and to NTFS and Windows which you are dealing with now. … Read More

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You must be writing about Windows sharing. Unless you are on a Windows Server OS, the list is only of the accounts the "server" knows about.

I'll dismiss the scenario of a Windows Client sharing when it's on a domain (just to keep it clear that's a different scenario.)

So "Everyone" is everyone with an account on this server. Unless you enable the Guest account. Then it's anyone, which is different from Everyone.

Confusing at first. And changes as we change Windows OSes from say Windows 7 Pro to Windows Server 2020.

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I'm strictly talking about Windows sharing ;)
I assume it's possible to add an account name per terminal\computer while all the terminals\computers share the same workgroup ? So I can assign what terminal\computer can have access to the folder\sub-folders based on the account name ? At the moment the only account names are "everyone".

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You can't talk strictly about Windows sharing because it varies from version to version of Windows. It's a mess.

On Windows Server versions you do this one way.
On Windows such as Windows 10 Pro, you add accounts on the "server" then add rights to the share and folder.

Take time to test all this out. And as Windows sharing is like you telling me you have jellybeans. Too many variables.
And Happy Easter.

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The accomblish what I want to do, I must add accounts.
Thanks and Happy Easter.

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I think you're catching on. For Windows Server the account management is a big part of running the OS.

For your Windows 10 Home, Pro and such the only accounts the OS knows of are the local accounts so we have to add those users and then look to adding them without using Everyone or enabling the Guest account. AGAIN, I dismiss the Domain and AD Windows client sharing scenario here.

It's a bit of a mess to maintain so I never endorse this method.

Edited by rproffitt: Spelling

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I have to add users to the local accounts; which has nothing to do with domains ?

AD Windows ?

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I've yet to determine which Windows so I have to write about Server versions and exclude the other scenario which differs.

I respect your need to keep secrets and wont' pry.

"AD" in this discussion would be Active Directory.

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I login into Windows using a Windows Account (outlook/hotmail) etc. Can I add a sub-account to the account I use to login to Windows; then as the host computer sharing the folder; I then can access the shared folder on another computer by making sure I have the correct credentials, which would be the correct password to access the shared folder / sub-folder ?

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Sorry Siberian but all this back and forth and I have to divine information. I'll respect this need for keeping it secrect and guess.

So for this sort of setup, it's a failure since use of the Email login means we have more testing of the home versions of Windows about accounts and sharing. I never use the email based logins here. I use a local login and for the share control you want, you either move to a Server version of Windows, Linux or such then add the user accounts then set share permissions per user or if Windows Server by group.

For this discussion you do nto have a Windows Server OS so you can only add users to the Windows "server" machine and work hard at creating permissions. It's not pretty or easy.

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I thought it would be obviously, but as you may or may not have guessed; I'm using Windows10 Pro. I understand email based logins are not a recommendations, I can't recall the reason as to why I'm using an email based login :-( :-)

Putting the email based login into consideration, I'm assuming you understood what my goal is; which is. I want to continue to login to Windows using the email based login but add users to this account, remember there is currently only one user; Everyone. If I share a folder and disable read or write to the folder, since it's applied to Everyone, if I try to access the folder on another machine and the folder has read permissions disabled then that folder can't be read on the other computer on the network.

If I can add a user then I can tell the folder to share the folder based on <UserName> when I want to access the folder on a networked computer, I will be promted for the <UserName> password and I will have access to the folder based on a different user.

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" I want to continue to login to Windows using the email based login but add users to this account, "

That's not possible. Windows Server offered users in groups but an user account can not add users. Can you share how you came to think that Windows and let's include Linux supported adding users to an user account?

Maybe this is all about share permissions which is not adding users to an account but users to the Windows installation then adding permissions to that share to allow these folk access to that folder?

-> In your last paragraph I will answer this will NEVER HAPPEN. What won't happen?
"If I can add a user then I can tell the folder to share the folder based on <UserName> when I want to access the folder on a networked computer, I will be promted for the <UserName> password and I will have access to the folder based on a different user."

Sorry no and never unless you create a monster amount of code. Due to something called single signon, that will never happen (without you creating a huge custom security system and a year or two in coding hell.)

I have a question. Why don't you use what Windows Sharing offers? Of if it must work the way you wrote here, time to bail to an OS that does what you want.

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" I want to continue to login to Windows using the email based login but add users to this account, "

That's not possible. Windows Server offered users in groups but an user account can not add users. Can you share how you came to think that Windows and let's include Linux supported adding users to an user account?

It could be I mis-understood what you wrote previously.

Maybe this is all about share permissions which is not adding users to an account but users to the Windows installation then adding permissions to that share to allow these folk access to that folder?

Does this mean that if one tries to access shared folder; as long as the user enters in the correct user to the Windows account and password they will be able to access the folder ? If so that would mean I would be populated with users on the Windows account; users as in thsoe who can also log into the host computer sharing the folder, correct ?

I have a question. Why don't you use what Windows Sharing offers? Of if it must work the way you wrote here, time to bail to an OS that does what you want.

Am I not using Windows sharing when sharing a folder on it's own ?

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As to the question about using what Windows sharing offers, yes you are sharing a folder on its own but your requirements blow up what Windows does. That is, you specified this to "when I want to access the folder on a networked computer, I will be promted for ..." which isn't how it works today. I'm sure somehow if you wrote enough code to make a custom security module you could but I would not help on that. It's a tar pit of a design and anyone that has tried it either vanished from view, burned up and went to Linux or came back from the void with a fresh appreciation that it's easier just to manage shares and accounts.

OK, that out of the way you wrote "Does this mean that if one tries to access shared folder; as long as the user enters in the correct user to the Windows account and password they will be able to access the folder ? If so that would mean I would be populated with users on the Windows account; users as in thsoe who can also log into the host computer sharing the folder, correct ?"

Almost correct. Since we are not using Windows Server the "server" is our choice of how we want to tackle the share. If you want to make sure that only certain usernames and passwords work for the login portion (we have yet to talk about share permissions!) then each user and their password would be an account on our "server."

After all these users have accounts on the server, then we give them rights to the shared folder.

-> Ever thought this is just a royal pain and you should just share data via a SQL Server?

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Is there a way in Windows, without creating accounts which can also be used to log into windows and rather strictly added accounts to shared folders; besides either going to Windows Server or Linux ?

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That's a two or more part question. To make the connection unique per PC the current implemention is, and this is keeping it simple, "Who are you and do you have rights to this?"

So to meet your goals changes with the OS but in all cases and OSes it's still going to require the server know this user and in your scenario so far you have asked to have a Windows share on a Windows client OS (not Server) so we have to work inside that framework.

So without creating accounts you lose control of the share since Windows sharing either allows connections by names and rights or wide open sharing (that guest account method which fails to meet a base requirement of yours.)

At this point why not take a few tutorials on Windows Administration since we are now at a point where it's clear you need that.

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Have any in mind, what I come across is nothing our of the ordinary; that or, it's a little mundane ?

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Not mundane at all. OSes, file systems, ownership, rights have a long history. My background goes from no file system OSes like what we had on old computers like GE-210 (dating myself) to CP/M, DOS, Novell, VAX VMS, UNIX and to NTFS and Windows which you are dealing with now.

If you are just arriving on the computer scene it may seem like a bit of a mess or hard work but I get that. We all start somewhere and here I had to divine what you wanted on what OS. If you can in the future leave out divination that would help us move faster.

Here's a very condensed primer: http://www.techradar.com/news/networking/windows-file-and-network-sharing-the-complete-guide-1119901

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Users are that in Windows10/8 etc (non-server) that are used to log into Windows, correct ? If so I assume I can limit the user to being able to login to Windows and strictly limit their credential to a shared folder, for example ?

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You have many questions.

  1. Users are that in Windows10/8 etc (non-server) that are used to log into Windows, correct ?
    Not entirely. Since we are on a non-server Windows OS the shares (and mind you I expect you to have read the tech article I noted) use the Windows accounts to know who is who. So to give the level of control you want, the share system must have some user accounting to effect this control. The easiest way would be to create as many users as you need so each connection uses that unique user account for access control.

  2. If so I assume I can limit the user to being able to login to Windows and strictly limit their credential to a shared folder, for example ?
    You'll need Windows Pro versions. Read https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc957048.aspx
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Users are that in Windows10/8 etc (non-server) that are used to log into Windows, correct ?

Correct.

The tutorial mentions to add a guest account within User Accounts, and to active this guest account. I don't have a guest account within User Accounts, only within Local Users as seen within Computer Management; I assume this makes a difference ?

Edited by Siberian: Guest and Local Guest

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The article also noted if we wanted control over which users do what, we remove the guest from the access list.

I fear you have to go over the tutorial again. I also fear you may just have to dive in again and again till access controls, accounts, permissions and rights begin to make sense. I can only take you so far.

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That's OK. The article is not limited to what I think you want to do but does dive into the settings, screens I would have to be conversant as well as au courant with those controls.

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I assume, there is a difference or I should treat the local user "guest" as if it's a user account "guest" ?

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The tutorial notes how guest is special. In Windows speak it's a way to allow a connection without an account.

There are many ways to configure access but many failed to meet your specifications. You are the ruler here but just like Science sometimes you can't do what you want.

This is why I've kicked it around with you here. So you can see what you can do.

At this point you should be ready to go. If not, why not add a team member on your project that has the needed skills?

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It's not that anything failed to meet my specifications; it's just that I don't have a User account "guest" and strictly only a local User "guest". And I can't add a "guest" User Account.

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Up at the top you wrote what you wanted sharing to do and it failed that spec.

About not adding a guest account, that's OK since it's a built in account that is enabled or disabled (your choice.)

Do I need to point back to what you asked for?

Edited by rproffitt: Spelling

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I think I'll be able to sort this out; I'll update when and if everything works out :)

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