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Hi guys!

My first post here so hopefully we can learn from each other and maybe make a few new friendships along the way. Thanks for having me!

I have a problem at home. I am using a wireless netgear router which is connected to my machine via ethernet cable but my two house mates are using their wireless laptops to connect but the connection often drops and calls for the router to be powercycled to resolve the matter.

I also work in I.T support for a major I.T company and we often get a lot of calls in relation to the same problem but nobody seems to know how to resolve the problem but rather treat the symptoms!!!

Is there anyone here that knows the root cause of this and how to stop it from occurring? I would actually like to know the cause as it's been bothering me for some time.

Thanks in advance

;)

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Last Post by barryt
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What you need first is to obtain a airwave analyzer application. It is not as scary as it sounds... something like AirSnort or NetStumbler for Windows will probably do (disclaimer: I run Linux and has never tried either application).

Find out what channels all the neighboring access points (that would be your router) are on. Although 802.11 gives you 11 channels (in North America), there are actually only 3 non-overlapping channels: 1, 6, and 11. If it is easier, just forget all the other channels, and stick to these three.

Most wireless routers come with channel 6 as the default, so if you have other neighbors who also have their wireless router set on channel 6, it is likely that you are both stepping on each other's RF toes. This is the most common problem in most wireless connectivity issues: channel overlapping.

Feel free to email me to PM me if this does not solve your problem.

-Josh

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It is a weird one. But thanks for the input guys.
I guess I need to do some reading up on wireless.

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It is a weird one. But thanks for the input guys.
I guess I need to do some reading up on wireless.

I think you should also try something simple too, like updating your router's firmware too.:idea:

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Yes, I agree you should try something simple/basic first. I just fixed my brother-in-law's problem with the same symptom. Turns out, he's been associating to the neighbor's Access Point this whole time without knowing it! His AP and the neighbors are set to the same channel, and they overlap. Once I helped him to associate to the correct Access Point, he doesn't have the drop-off problem anymore.

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Howdy every one ;

I need help : I would like to set up a Java program that allows me to encrypt a given pdf file.
Could you help me please ?
Thank you very much indeed.

Votes + Comments
dont hijack otehr peoples thread
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Howdy every one ;

I need help : I would like to set up a Java program that allows me to encrypt a given pdf file.
Could you help me please ?
Thank you very much indeed.

Please : I have no intention to "steal or hijack" your thread : I am new to this web site ! I was just awkward. So, forgive me for that !

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What you need first is to obtain a airwave analyzer application. It is not as scary as it sounds... something like AirSnort or NetStumbler for Windows will probably do (disclaimer: I run Linux and has never tried either application).

Find out what channels all the neighboring access points (that would be your router) are on. Although 802.11 gives you 11 channels (in North America), there are actually only 3 non-overlapping channels: 1, 6, and 11. If it is easier, just forget all the other channels, and stick to these three.

Most wireless routers come with channel 6 as the default, so if you have other neighbors who also have their wireless router set on channel 6, it is likely that you are both stepping on each other's RF toes. This is the most common problem in most wireless connectivity issues: channel overlapping.

Feel free to email me to PM me if this does not solve your problem.

-Josh

Hi all,

I'm having the same issue. Hardwired computers have no problem, but wireless connections frequently drop and require a router power cycle.

I've been through every channel and even tried changing the broadcast band to B exclusively. I've also upgraded firmware and the problem persists.

Any other ideas?


Richard

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Hi I also have a netgear router that has been experiencing the same intermittent wireless connection problems for weeks now (WNR 854T). I have recently used the free inSSIDer to check whether there was network cross over (http://www.metageek.net/products/inssider). It worked a treat, a neighbours network was running right upto my networks bandwidth. I have therefore reduced the speed of my router from its max of 300 to 145MBPS (much quicker than my internet connection :-)). This narrowed my bandwidth usage and so far no more problems and my network seems to be running much quicker. Hope this helps...

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I also use a wireless network and had the same issue's with dropped connection often.I was using a Link sys WRT54G router and a Netgear WG311T 108 PCI adapter. And when ever the wife would fire up the micro-wave, boom no connection. Tried all channel's even bought a Belkin 14dB antenna, which from best I could tell definitely took the neighbors interference out of the picture. Finally got fed up enough called Charter and and they brought me out a U10C019, which also had many issue's. So I called them back and had to REQUEST a SMCD3GN, which after much discussion they reluctantly delivered(I guess they think they're made of gold or something....lol) and it came at the same monthly charge as the B/G router. Then installed a WN311B PCI card and now have 2 desktops and 3 labtop's all wireless and Direct TV is connected to 1 of the Ethernet ports for Video on demand movie downloads. And not a lick of trouble since. So my suggestion move to N band router's and card's it's allot more reliable.

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