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Somone told me to use a sniffer to count the packages, and then multiplie it with the mtu or somthing...??? (im realy bad at maths...)

Are you sure there aren't a program that I can downoad?

Why? Im working on a lan with about 10 other users. We got a 3gb download limit - meaning we may not dowload more that 3gb per month.

I want to monitoir how much I am using, and how much there is left to use. O and I' not the administrator, but this will help that we dont go over the downoad cap.

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Last Post by Gaara
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Somone told me to use a sniffer to count the packages, and then multiplie it with the mtu or somthing...??? (im realy bad at maths...)

Are you sure there aren't a program that I can downoad?

Why? Im working on a lan with about 10 other users. We got a 3gb download limit - meaning we may not dowload more that 3gb per month.

I want to monitoir how much I am using, and how much there is left to use. O and I' not the administrator, but this will help that we dont go over the downoad cap.

Why use a program? Can't you use Excel or some other application to account for each download? For instance, you find something you want to download, you enter the download size in the corresponding Excel column and calculate the sum. The standard unit shown for a given download is usually MB so you'd use that unit. Or you can have seperate columns for a given unit of measure, calculate it, convert it and then determine the sum of all columns using the standard MB unit. Anyway, just an idea. MTU = Maximun Transfer Unit, and depending on the context, the MTU could account not only for the actual data (i.e. download data) but also for a protocol header and other protocol specific information.

If you have a specific directory you download to you can use the following process:
Open up a Command Prompt: Start->Run->Type in CMD
Once the command prompt is open, open up MS calculator by typing in: calc
Navigate to the directory you download to: CD download_directory
Find the size of all files in the current and sub-directories: DIR /S
At the bottom of the each directory listing, you'll notice where it reads something similar to "6 File(s) 3, 079, 678 bytes - Depending on how may sub-directories under you download directory you have, this will show that many times.
Using the calculator program, add all the file bytes indicated from the DIR command
Once you've calculated the sum divide that sum by 1024 and then divide by 1024 again to get the number of megs. If you want to know the number of GB, just divide by 1024 again.

It probably be better to record these calculation results. Maybe you can later write or find a program that will show you stastically your downloading frequency. Just some ways and I hope I've helped.


Good luck, LamaBot

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How much is one packet(1kb?), if i know that then i dont need anything else.

O and i want to know the total that a spesific user download not only bits and parts of what he download. I want to know how much i can still download cuz we got a download cap.

If i know how much 1 packet is it will sort out the problem. Thx

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