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I have been searching for information on CS for about a month before I found this web site. :p After reading "Programing FAQ" I have decided to start with python and then to move onto a version of C(although I have not decided which one yet). Would this be a good plan?

My next problem is deciding which book(s) to use. I learned Apple Basic in High School and that is about as far as my CS has gone. I had lots of fun and want to create the same attutude in my boys. I have looked at a few books/programs (Apple Basic-old, Liberty Basic) and they are all so different from each other. Some are very vague in the explanation of the language and others are very clear as to what each step means but are in the wrong language. Any suggestions.

Another question: How do I get our Windows 2000 Pro and/or 2000 XP computers to allow my boys to try their skills without creating problems with the current system?

I would appreciate any advice, ideas, or suggestions.

Thank You

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Last Post by dearlymom
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I don't think that python to C is a good beginner's introduction. I would begin with either C++ or Java as a first serious, object oriented language. Some here might argue to go with C#, or even a web-based language such as PHP. However, the reason that I strongly believe that C++ and Java are good foundations is because they are what is most often used in Computer Science academia. Most Computer Science theory and algorithms are explained, taught and implemented via C (or C++), for example.

In addition, you say "Children and CS". What age children are we dealing with? Are you trying to introduce the 13 year old to his or her first taste of programming? Or are we dealing with an undergraduate computer science style curriculum?

As far as how exactly to run the code. That I unfortunately am not sure of. I use my mac to compile via gcc, the free GNU unix/linux/mac compiler. And on my windows machine, I use Microsoft Visual Studio.NET. While there is an academic version, I'm not so sure it's hefty pricetag would make for a good "fiddling around and learning" program for kids. However, for any serious coding, it is a must.

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I am teaching a soon to be 12 year old who is bored with 8th grade math. I want to add something to his math lessons(spice it up a little) without making him or me stuggle to much. In the first post, I am only familar with Apple Basic. I will also be teaching my 15 year who struggles slightly with algebra. Yes, this will be their first taste in programing.

Did I misunderstand "Programing FAQ"? After reading that thread I was under the impression that python was a good basic program and that C++ and Java were hard to learn.

I am pretty dumb when it come to computer lingo, would you please explain your second paragraph.

Thank you

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