Hello again.

as some of you may know Im creating a software based on SQL dataserver,

every code I use is good and work
and I use this connection string

 Dim conn As Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection
 conn = New Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection("Data Source=192.168.0.100,1433;Network Library=DBMSSOCN;Initial Catalog=SS;User ID=Al;Password=altn")

But the ip is the other pc (next to me) lan IP

what IP I should use to connect to the pc if I am far from my home?

Hi

That depends if that computer is visible outside of your company network (probably not) and whether you can connect to your company network via some form of VPN. If you can connect via VPN then that IP should be reachable when you are not in the office.

Im 18 and the server is my other pc..

and Im using lan IP to connect between b oth pc. on 22 april I have to present my app on a different city. how to connect with it?

PS: ARSENALLLLLLLLLLL <3

I'm not a network expert so hopefully someone with more knowledge will chip in, but at the very least, you will need to make sure your PC (or at least SQL Server) is visible to the outside world.

Are you taking your own computer with you to demonstrate your application? If so, why not install a local version of SQL Server and take a copy of the database with you.

PS: ARSENALLLLLLLLLLL <3

:)

So where are your database going to be? Each client will have it's own DB? Will there be only one DB on the web for all clients?
The IP you should use depends on where your app should find the DB.

The app will be on my school. and will be only 1 DB (10 gb)
the "server" will be on my home.

Ok, so you'll need to use the external IP from your home. If you go to https://www.whatismyip.com/ you'll see your external ip.

Be aware of:
1. If you have firewall and/or router in your home, you'll need to configure them to open the SQL Server requested ports.
2. If you don't explicit request for a fixed IP, most ISP will provide you with DHCP, that will probably change your external ip from time to time (depending on the ISP settings)

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