0

Hi, I currently use two monitors and I think there would be a benefit in upgrading to 3. When I am developing in visual studio, I have the code on one screen, the debug tools on the other, and I want to have a third for the application itself to reside on.

So I know that I need to get a PCI video card, since my current card only supports two monitors. The thing is, I have 4GB of RAM in my computer but Windows only recognizes 3 GB of it because as it was explained to me, the 32 bit Windows 4GB limit is shared between main memory and video memory. So my 1 GB of video RAM is factored in here, and thus my main memory space is lowered to 3 GB by windows. I'm concerned that if I get a PCI video card, I'm going to lose even MORE addressable space in my main memory.

I guess I could upgrade my system to a 64 bit, but I haven't looked into the cost and assume it would be pricey. Also would my 32 bit apps still work? I get the feeling I would need all new software... which would be a big no thank you.

Anyway, I would value the memory space more than a third monitor, so if anyone can confirm for me that this indeed would shrink my memory space I probably won't bother. But if I am mistaken maybe I will consider the third monitor.

2
Contributors
3
Replies
4
Views
8 Years
Discussion Span
Last Post by mechbas
0

Not really a concern. System RAM is different from Graphics RAM which is on the video card itself. You are NOT using system RAM for the graphics devices that you now use. System RAM is used by the CPU only.

0

Not really a concern. System RAM is different from Graphics RAM which is on the video card itself. You are NOT using system RAM for the graphics devices that you now use. System RAM is used by the CPU only.

Hmm, but if that's the case then why does my current 4 gigs of RAM only show 3? Is it just a coincidence that my graphics card has 1 gig of video ram?

0

Bios demands eat up some of the orig. 4 to somewhere near 3.
Unless onboard device g.c.s use own onboard RAM.

This topic has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.
Have something to contribute to this discussion? Please be thoughtful, detailed and courteous, and be sure to adhere to our posting rules.