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Hello all,

Thanks to anyone who can help me in any capacity. I recently bought and attempted to install a RAM card (1 GB DDR 180 pin) that was incompatible for my computer. Apparently the card I bought worked at 400 MHZ but my computer can only run 266 MHZ max. When I put that card in, my computer started up (I left the side cover off to observe), but there was no startup beep, and there is no output on any monitor that I tried (2 seperate ones). Once I figured out that it was incompatible (via tech support) I tried to put my old one back in, but I still get no output on my monitor, and no startup beep. My computer is running as soon as I turn the power on, and all the fans are running (including the one on the graphics card), but I have no output on my monitor. I've made sure my RAM and graphics card were seated properly over and over. My graphics card is snuggly in it's slot, and I made sure that the RAM clips have latched down on both sides of the chip. If anyone can provide any assistance, tips, or help, that would be greatly appreciated

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Last Post by tcollins17
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Did you put it back in the same ram slot that you took it out of?

I believe memory slots are in an order fashioned so if you put the RAM in slot two and there is not RAM in slot one then the mother board thinks you don't have RAM.

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The DDR400 would have been ok. It would just have been clocked down to your pc's specs.
As well as MatEpp's suggestion, try clearing your cmos by either using the jumper, or removing the motherboard battery, or both. Leave for 10-15 minutes then put back.
You will have to re-set your system clock in the bios after.

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Did you put it back in the same ram slot that you took it out of?

I believe memory slots are in an order fashioned so if you put the RAM in slot two and there is not RAM in slot one then the mother board thinks you don't have RAM.

The DDR400 would have been ok. It would just have been clocked down to your pc's specs.
As well as MatEpp's suggestion, try clearing your cmos by either using the jumper, or removing the motherboard battery, or both. Leave for 10-15 minutes then put back.
You will have to re-set your system clock in the bios after.

I did put the RAM back in the slot that it was originally in. When I go home, I will try your suggestion, "crunchie". First, I will put in the other RAM, and then I will try to clear my CMOS by using the jumper and removing the motherboard battery.

ONE QUESTION though, how do I do those two things?
Once I have instructions, I will do those and report back on what happened. Thank both of you for your help so far!

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On the motherboard you will see a round battery. Remove that. There may also be a jumper with "cmos" written close by. That is dependent on your motherboard. Without knowing what it is, I cannot say where it is.

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On the motherboard you will see a round battery. Remove that. There may also be a jumper with "cmos" written close by. That is dependent on your motherboard. Without knowing what it is, I cannot say where it is.

I don't know off the top of my head, but a quick google search gave me the following information:

eMachines T2625
AMD Athlon XP2600+ Processor on a VIA KM266 Motherboard

Does that mean anything to you? When I get home, I will try your advice and report back if it works. Thank you!

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Apparently, the BIOS (???) gets reset when I take out the battert, and put it back. I was told that I should right down my BIOS settings before I take out the battery, but since my computer is down, how do I find out what my BIOS settings are? Does resetting the jumper on the motherboard reset the BIOS settings too?

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Yes, resetting the BIOS is what crunchie is wanting to accomplish. I do not see any reason to record what your BIOS settings are unless YOU have changed the settings to personal preferences, such as overclocking.

Then again it couldn't hurt. If you can even get to the BIOS menu, when the computer boots it will say press delete now or f1, some key like that to go to the menu. It may not be called the BIOS.

Also when the computer is booting up it usually displays the BIOS version. But that is for updating reasons, still if you can you might want to jot that down.

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Yes, resetting the BIOS is what crunchie is wanting to accomplish. I do not see any reason to record what your BIOS settings are unless YOU have changed the settings to personal preferences, such as overclocking.

Then again it couldn't hurt. If you can even get to the BIOS menu, when the computer boots it will say press delete now or f1, some key like that to go to the menu. It may not be called the BIOS.

Also when the computer is booting up it usually displays the BIOS version. But that is for updating reasons, still if you can you might want to jot that down.

I haven't made any changes to the BIOS, so I should be fine with the default settings? Since my ORIGINAL problem was the fact that I was not receiving an output to my monitor although my computer was running, when I reset the BIOS, how will I know if I did it correctly? Should I expect to see an output now from my monitor?

(BTW, my monitor is not the problem as I tried multiple monitors, and I don't receive an output on any of them.

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Yep, that's the plan. Did it not work?

See, assuming that you are using integrated graphics(graphics built into your motherboard) then the graphics needs your memory to be working in order to display anything on your monitor.

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Yep, that's the plan. Did it not work?

See, assuming that you are using integrated graphics(graphics built into your motherboard) then the graphics needs your memory to be working in order to display anything on your monitor.

I have not tried it yet as I am still at work (leaving now). I am going to go home and try it! I hope all goes well!!

Is there a chance of me losing information from my hard drive if I do this? That is pretty much the only thing that I am worried about losing, and I would like to take steps to protect my files that I haven't backed up yet.

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Ha! Watch as soon as I say no your hard-drive will be fine you loose all your data in a freak accident.

Anyways, the answer is no your hard-drive will be fine.

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A funny thing happened when I went home and checked out my computer. I was looking for the battery on the motherboard to remove, and I found this circular well, with a clip in it. It was obvious that something is missing from that slot. Is it safe to assume that that is where the MOBO battery used to reside? (It was located on a corner of the motherboard, next to a chip that listed the name of the motherboard VIA).
I can only imagine that the battery got knocked out while I was fiddling around with the RAM things. I cannot find the battery so I will have to buy a new one tomorrow. If this is the battery that you two were referencing, is there a specific type of battery for my motherboard, or does any MOBO battery suffice?
Once I buy a new one and put it in, I will see if that works. Thank you for your help, and your continued assistance. I would appreciate your answers on the question above.

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make sure you unplug the power cable from the back of you computer BEFORE taking out the battery :)

Considering the fact that my last update stated that my battery popped out at an unknown time, can you please state the ramifications of taking the battery out before taking out the power cord? I am not saying that it happened, it's just possible considering the fact that I don't know when the battery came out.

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Well I cant be certain if that is the CMOS battery. So I'll tell you that the battery is basically a watch battery. So if you don't see a watch battery attached on your motherboard then I suppose the CMOS could have fell out.

I have never replaced a CMOS battery so I couldn't tell you for sure if they vary or not. You should be able to get that information through some research though.

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When I was typing MOBO battery, I meant CMOS battery...

All of the watch batteries that I had were really small, like half the size of a penny...this slot would hold a circular object about a little bigger than a penny. The slot had a clip at the bottom of it, and it also had a clip on the side of it. I imagine that it kept the battery in place. I will commence research now on CMOS batteries.

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Not everyone in the world knows the size of a penny :p. The battery will be about 15mm in diameter and about 3-4 mm thick.
Check your pockets. You may have picked it up thinking it was a silver coin :D.
Go to an electronics shop for the battery. AFAIK, they are all pretty much the same battery.

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and if it fell out when you were changing ram ,you are far to rough on your computer when working on it , as for removing power cable before removing the battery you should be more concerned that you did that when changing your ram, that could cause far more problem that removing you battery with the power plugged in !

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Would not having a CMOS battery actually cause any problems? I was thinking that the computer would just be slow to boot up as it has to rescan the hardware every time it is booted. And the time may have to be reset. Besides that I'm not sure that there would be any problems. Unless the manufacturer of the motherboard made it so it will not run without a CMOS battery.

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Would not having a CMOS battery actually cause any problems? I was thinking that the computer would just be slow to boot up as it has to rescan the hardware every time it is booted. And the time may have to be reset. Besides that I'm not sure that there would be any problems. Unless the manufacturer of the motherboard made it so it will not run without a CMOS battery.

I bought a CMOS battery today from radioshack, so when I get home, I will put it in, and I will write in on what happened.

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Would not having a CMOS battery actually cause any problems? I was thinking that the computer would just be slow to boot up as it has to rescan the hardware every time it is booted. And the time may have to be reset. Besides that I'm not sure that there would be any problems. Unless the manufacturer of the motherboard made it so it will not run without a CMOS battery.

no,as long as its[computer ] kept plugged in to the power outlet ,the bios info is saved ,if you have a removed or dead battery and you unplug the towwer the info will go back to defaults

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I put the CMOS battery in the slot (positive side up), but unfortunately I still receive no output to my monitor. Everything is up and running, all the lights in and on the computer are on, and all the fans are running, but still no output. I even here the drives clicking as if the something was checking to see if the drives were operational (lights flash on that as well). I did notice that my keyboard was unresponsive when I turned the keyboard on. When I pressed number or caps lock, the corresponding light did not turn on. I know it is receiving power because when I put in the cord, the keyboard strip lights up. What is my next step?

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I know it is receiving power because when I put in the cord, the keyboard strip lights up. What is my next step?

i have no idea, sorry, time to take to someone to have a look at it

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I believe that I/O is handled on a dedicated chip that uses your RAM, but not your processor. No one has corrected me yet.

So I think it is bad memory. Basically where we have been all along. As caperjack said, time for someone to look at it. They will have the spare parts to test on it to see what is bad.

Good luck, I know how frustrating the processes of fixing a PC is.

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You can also try one stick in one dimm at a time and attempt to boot up. So, turn off the power then hit the power button on the pc to discharge any residual power in the capacitors. Remove all sticks of RAM.
Remove the motherboard battery again for good measure.
Install one stick of RAM into the 1st slot. Install the battery. Turn on the power and start the pc.
Repeat that procedure until you have exhausted your options.

One thing. When you changed your RAM at the beginning, did you have an anti-static strap on one of your wrists, or ground yourself to the pc's frame with one hand before removing parts? Could be that something got zapped with static.

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