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Can anyone tell me if the CPU I just bought is compatible with my computer? I have a Compaq Presario S6000NX with an Intel Celeron CPU running at 2.7 GHz. I just bought an Intel Pentium4 Processor (2.8GHz)with Hyper-Threading technology. Of course, both of these CPU's have the same socket size. When the Pentium4 was installed, the computer did not power up. I also just upgraded my power supply to 550W. I welcome any questions or information on my dilemma.

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Last Post by caperjack
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There is no BIOS update listed for that PC either, which would enable the processor to be recognisd by it.

Unfortunately, Compaq PCs are usually very limited for upgrade potential. The BIOS is generally crippled somewhat, and does not accept substantial processor upgrades.

That said, it may be a motherboard chipset limitation. The motherboard may be able to accept an earlier Pentium 4 2.8GHz version, but not the latest model which runs at that clockspeed. If that is the case then nothing will help. But before you give up try removing the motherboard CMOS battery for several minutes at least, then replacing the battery, power cord and power and then booting it up.

That procedure 'resets' the system, ans it may then recognise the processor. Worth a try, anyway.

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This link shows you motherboard info ,it says 1.7 to 2.8 or higher ,.not sure why yours isn't booting ,Im guessing its because your board probably doesnt support the hyper threading cpu .
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?docname=c00063244&dlc=en&lc=en&cc=ca

caperjack,

Thanks for the info. That is the exact board I have in my computer. Looks like I may need to upgrade the motherboard. But another response said to try one thing out before I replace it. I'll keep you guys posted.

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There is no BIOS update listed for that PC either, which would enable the processor to be recognisd by it.

Unfortunately, Compaq PCs are usually very limited for upgrade potential. The BIOS is generally crippled somewhat, and does not accept substantial processor upgrades.

That said, it may be a motherboard chipset limitation. The motherboard may be able to accept an earlier Pentium 4 2.8GHz version, but not the latest model which runs at that clockspeed. If that is the case then nothing will help. But before you give up try removing the motherboard CMOS battery for several minutes at least, then replacing the battery, power cord and power and then booting it up.

That procedure 'resets' the system, ans it may then recognise the processor. Worth a try, anyway.

Catweazle,

I'll give that a try. Hopefully it'll work. It'll save me a few bucks more. I'll keep you posted. Thanks for the info.

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If it turns out that your PC will not accept the processor, I'd suggest you replace the system case as well as the motherboard. Compaq cases are generally quite solid, but they are non-standard in design, and very difficult to work on when adding, removing or replacing internal components.

You should also realise that you will need a retail copy of Windows XP as well, becuase the OEM copy included will not be transferrable. Once you replace a motherboard, your system is classified as a new one. The Windows XP installation you have will fail to start, because it will detect the new hardware and see the motherboard change as the replacement of numerous components. (There are actually 10 to 12 components on the motherboard which are included in the anti-piracy audit.)

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If it turns out that your PC will not accept the processor, I'd suggest you replace the system case as well as the motherboard. Compaq cases are generally quite solid, but they are non-standard in design, and very difficult to work on when adding, removing or replacing internal components.

You should also realise that you will need a retail copy of Windows XP as well, becuase the OEM copy included will not be transferrable. Once you replace a motherboard, your system is classified as a new one. The Windows XP installation you have will fail to start, because it will detect the new hardware and see the motherboard change as the replacement of numerous components. (There are actually 10 to 12 components on the motherboard which are included in the anti-piracy audit.)

Thanks for taking the time into looking for information on my dilemma. It's really helpful. Looks like I'll be spending a few extra buck after all, but at least I'll be up to date with my computer. I'll keep you in mind IF I have any other problems. Once again, THANK YOU VERY MUCH!

P.S. Just curious, which Windows XP version is better, Home or Professional? Or, what would you recommend?

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You only need Professional if you intend to connect the PC to a large network. XP Home edition is limited with regard to networking, but in most other respects is virtually identical. The defrag tool is not as good but that's about it!

XP Home is perfectly adequate for the needs of the vast majority of people.

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