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I just installed my new motherboard and got it to boot everything up. There is just one little problem.:evil: Every time it gets to the windows bootup screen, the entire computer resets. It doesn't matter if I put it on safe mode or regular boot. And I am currently running that hard drive on another tower so I know that is not the problem. Please help!!:sad:

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Last Post by DMR
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I just installed my new motherboard and got it to boot everything up. There is just one little problem.:evil: Every time it gets to the windows bootup screen, the entire computer resets. It doesn't matter if I put it on safe mode or regular boot. And I am currently running that hard drive on another tower so I know that is not the problem. Please help!!:sad:

Once we know what version of Windows you are running and what the brand and model of the motherboard are, we might be able to help. It sounds like a problem with the BIOS settings.

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If that's Windows XP there, then a motherboard replacement should ideally be accompanied by a clean install.

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Hopefully you reinstalled windows when you installed the new motherboard. You'll have less problems when you do that.

If you haven't...there's your culprit.

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Matter of fact, if that's Windows XP there, and you've already tried to boot up with the hard drive after changing the motherboard, you're best to format and reinstall right now!


It is possible, some of the time at least, to swap your existing Windows XP installation over to another motherboard. Trouble is, you need to make some driver changes first, boot from your Windows XP CD without letting the system start to boot from hard drive first, and then perform an 'In Place Upgrade' install.

You still need to re-activate afterwards, and if you've allowed the system to attempt booting from hard drive, forget it!

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Yes, I have windows xp, the motherboard is a Biostar P4VTB, and yes, I have already tried to boot from the hard drive. Does that mean there is no hope for it as is? If I need to reinstall windows, how can I do that and still keep all of my settings and installed programs in place, and if I need to reformat the hard drive, how do I transfer my programs and settings over. And when I do reinstall windows, can I still activate it under the same security key.

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Does the motherboard's POST show the correct amount of RAM, the correct processor speed, etc?

What temps is the system running at?

Can you boot into safemode?

Have you upgraded your motherboard to the latest BIOS?

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Yes, I have windows xp, the motherboard is a Biostar P4VTB, and yes, I have already tried to boot from the hard drive. Does that mean there is no hope for it as is? If I need to reinstall windows, how can I do that and still keep all of my settings and installed programs in place, and if I need to reformat the hard drive, how do I transfer my programs and settings over. And when I do reinstall windows, can I still activate it under the same security key.

You've 'fallen foul' of XP's product activation anti-piracy measures :sad:

Try an 'In Place Upgrade'. This Microsoft article describes how.
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;315341&Product=winxp

If that doesn't resurrect it, then it's a format and clean install, and in that case your programs and settings are gone, and will have to be reinstalled. Changing a motherboard should be prepared for beforehand, not afterwards.

As long as your Windows XP is a legitimate, retail version activiation will be fine. At worst you'll have to ring Microsoft's activation centre and activate by phone.

But if you've an OEM copy, you shouldn't have upgraded. Changing a motherboard for that one is classified as a 'new system', and breaches the license agreement.

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But if you've an OEM copy, you shouldn't have upgraded. Changing a motherboard for that one is classified as a 'new system', and breaches the license agreement.

I don't think hardware upgrade constitutes a 'new system'
http://www.microsoft.com/oem/downloads/X0933534LBL.pdf

I can't find anything in the above link that supports it...but then again, perhaps I'm not reading the fine print. As far as I am concerned though, I've upgraded motherboards 4 times since I've had my XP Home installed and each time I've been able to activate my OEM install. So, if it does breach the agreement, wouldn't macro$haft make it so you couldn't activate more than once? Just wondering...

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Yes, a motherboard replacement is definitely classified as a 'new system' under Microsoft's License terms. You can get around it if you've purchased the OEM edition as a 'bundled' item with other internal component(s), but you need to mount a case with Microsoft's reactivation personnel to do so.

Did you reactivate your copy by telephone or by internet? Are you sure that's an OEM copy you have there? I've had others claim the same as you in the past, and it's turned out that they actually were using a copy of Windows XP Professional Corporate Edition, which doesn't contain product activation technology.

I've several OEM Windows XP Home Edition CDs here, and I've tried to make them do just what you describe. They just won't do it! In fact, changing a motherboard usually results in a system which won't even boot, as changing a motherboard represents a change to about a dozen components. That's why it's classed as a 'new system'.

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You've 'fallen foul' of XP's product activation anti-piracy measures :sad:

But if you've an OEM copy, you shouldn't have upgraded. Changing a motherboard for that one is classified as a 'new system', and breaches the license agreement.

I bought windows because I was creating a totally new system. The only reason I had installed windows before recieving my new motherboard is I wanted to get everything set up beforehand. so when I got it all together, I could start playing games right away.

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It is possible, to install the old motherboard, and then do a "File and settings transfer wizard" from the working installation. This will not copy over your software, but many of the settings for them. Backgrounds, preferences for size/view/etc, IE favorites. This program can also be customized to copy over just about anything else that you want. You have to store the information somewhere, either a second HD, or a network share. This may be a bit of overkill though if you have very little on the HD already. This is a problem when we as humans get impatient. :-/ Usually, with any operating system, not just Windows, it is best to install it on as much of the hardware as it will be using as is possible. At least the same motherboard. Good luck, and let us know what route you end up taking, and what works for you.

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I bought windows because I was creating a totally new system. The only reason I had installed windows before recieving my new motherboard is I wanted to get everything set up beforehand. so when I got it all together, I could start playing games right away.

Is your copy of Windows XP a Retail or an OEM copy. If it's OEM, you may need to ring Microsoft's product activation centre and explain what has occurred, to enable you to reactivate.

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