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Hello all. I am wondering if I will be able to achieve DIMM performance with a RAM setup as such:

2 x 512MB = 1024MB (DIMM DDR, PC3200, 400Mhz - both)
2 x 1024MB RAM = 2048MB (DIMM DDR, PC3200, 400Mhz - both)

This would give me a total of 3072MB of RAM. However, would I still retain the ability to use the DIMM technology for faster RAM speeds and all the enhancements that come with using RAM of the same type?

Thank you for your help! =)

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Last Post by Gamzarme
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Well DIMM is just Dual Inline memory Module meaning they read and write on both edges of the clock resulting in faster data transfer. So yes if using DIMM you will have DIMM technology.

Hope this helps

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I didnt think you could use ram like that:
Kits bieng different sizes(512 per stick vs 1024 per stick)

I thought you needed the exact same Sticks? Thats why they sell them in kits like this.
You would have to choose either one over the other and get 2 of one type of kits if you
want to fill your memmory slots.

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Oops! Wow. This is me not paying attention to the correct terminology! (much less the wrong names, etc.)

Anyway. I meant Dual Channel Memory instead of DIMM.
Here is an excerpt from my motherboards electronic manual:

Dual Channel Memory Configuration
The GA-K8N Ultra-SLI/GA-K8N Pro-SLI/GA-K8N-SLI supports the Dual Channel Technology. When the
Dual Channel Technology is activated, the bandwidth of memory bus will be double the original one.
Due to CPU limitation, if you want to operate the Dual Channel Technology, please follow the guidelines
below for Dual Channel memory configuration.
1. Dual Channel mode will not be enabled if only one DDR memory module is installed.
2. To enable Dual Channel mode with 2 memory modules (it is recommended to use memory
modules of identical brand, size, chips, and speed), you must install them into DIMM sockets
of the same color.
3. To enable Dual Channel mode with 4 memory modules, it is recommended to use memory
modules of identical brand, size, chips, and speed.

This doesn't exactly make much sense..as it says nothing about mixing different pairs of the same type/make of RAM to achieve the Dual Channel benefit.

By the way, what has to be exactly the same for the Dual Channel technology to be available?

@ ProgrammersTalk:
Well, I would buy all new memory (and have even thought very much about that), but I already have two sticks of 512MB DIMM memory, though with different latencies and other such mismatched information. However, the fact that they are PC3200, 400MHz clockrate (DDR) remains the same and this is what I know to provide Dual Channel memory. Though I could most definitely be wrong (not uncommon! see first post about "DIMM". lol).

I am thinking that two 1GB sticks would be a nice boost instead of two more 512MB sticks because 3GB is nicer than two and I already have one 1GB stick of PC3200, 400MHz clockrate (DDR) of RAM. So with buying a $49 1GB stick of RAM would be the same as buying two sticks of 512MB RAM, and I would have 3GB instead of 2GB and spend the same amount of money, while not letting my existing 1GB stick of RAM go to waste.

Does that make any sense? It just might not..I've been known to do something like that..hmm.
Well...thanks for you guys' replies! =)

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Well you kinda answered you own question with what it says in your MOBO manual >> #2/#3, Identical Brand, Size, Chips and Speed <<, If you want to use Dual Channel RAM you have to have identical sticks. So you going to have to exact same stick in all the slots you are using otherwise it may cause problems or not work at all.

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Well you kinda answered you own question with what it says in your MOBO manual >> #2/#3, Identical Brand, Size, Chips and Speed <<, If you want to use Dual Channel RAM you have to have identical sticks. So you going to have to exact same stick in all the slots you are using otherwise it may cause problems or not work at all.

Hmm. I guess I did.. =/
Oh well. I'll just end up ordering two more 512MB sticks of RAM to complete my 2GB with four sticks of RAM. That will be enough for me anyway. By the way, how does Vista run with 2GB of RAM? Or is 4GB a real-life recommendation?

One last question: is the speed increase all that great from regular RAM configuration to Dual Channel configuration. I mean, what exactly changes? Just the RAM speed? So instead of 400MHz of RAM at 512MB (for example), I'll have 800MHz of RAM at 1GB (1024MB)?

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I have not had any experience with Vista personaly but from what I hear there are mixed reviews some say its a bit slower than XP others say its a bit faster.

Basically the main point of Dual Channel Ram is to eliminate Bottlenecks. If your CPU has a faster Bus Speed than Memory speed it will fall to the bottleneck effect where the memory is unable to keep up with the CPU because of the data flow, so the CPU has nothing to do while the memory struggles.

Heres a link that talks about this topic a bit its a PDF *LINK*

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Okay, I believe that I do understand. For instance, I have an Athlon 64 3500+ processor (note the product number: ADA3500DAA4BW) and am wondering how the RAM speed (PC3200 - 400MHz regular, 800Mhz Dual Channel) would factor in with this processor.
However, I have found mismatched information concerning this type of processor. The manufacturers link states that the FSB is 2000MHz (additional specifications), but this is a higher number than another link at both the Wikipedia entry and CPU-World, which labels the FSB at 1000MHz. (Am I correct to assume that it is the FSB of the CPU which directly interfaces with the memory speed of the RAM?)

So, with this information can I determine that in both cases the memory clock on the FSB (2000MHz or 1000Mhz) will be greater than the Dual Channel memory running at a maximum speed of 800Mhz?

If it is, with the information provided, possible to shed some light on this situation, I would greatly appreciate that. Thank you. =)

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