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I plan on making a web server for myself. Just a small site for myself containing my blog and a small infrequently updated webcomic, nothing huge and commercial and was wondering what is generally the best Linux to use for this. I have made web servers before using Windows XP and Ubuntu (can't remember which release, likely 7.something) so I have experience in making servers and I know how so I'm not asking how to set one up, just what operating system is generally the best to use.

I realise everyone will likely have a different opinion so hopefully we will have a friendly debate over the advantages and disadvantages of using each distro as a web server.

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Last Post by Moncky
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CentOS. It is what is used in most web hosting centers and is designed for web hosting. Also if you want to use it as an email server check out qmailtoaster. They have a series of scripts that install and configure Apache, PHP and MySQL for you with a very secure configuration.

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CentOS. It is what is used in most web hosting centers and is designed for web hosting. Also if you want to use it as an email server check out qmailtoaster. They have a series of scripts that install and configure Apache, PHP and MySQL for you with a very secure configuration.

No no no this is all wrong, you have to say - Whats up doc! first -__-

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I will need to configure it to send e-mails as I intend to have some sort of "contact us" form on the site but I'm currently using Google Services to host my domain's e-mail which is working really well for me so I was planning on staying with that.

I will have a look into CentOS. Thanks for the suggestion.

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I would personally recommend gentoo, I know asking any question along the lines of which distro is best is almost like starting a religious discussion.

The pros for using gentoo are:

1) If set up correctly it can be a little faster than any other distro out there
2) It isn't designed for any specific use you configure it with the apps you need for a particular purpose
3) You only install what you need and nothing else
4) If you can get gentoo installed and working correctly you will learn more about linux than you ever thought possible.

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First and formost, CentOS is a Red Hat derivative, which automatically discounts it for me. I think Linux is suppose to be a FREE OS, not a "some of it's free, but if you want it to work right pay us a bunch of money" OS.

Liliafan made a good suggestion, Gentoo is a great OS for any purpose, as is Slackware, Arch, and my preference Debian. I would recommend one of these and stay away from the corporate or corporate derivative linux' distros.

However, this is purely a personal preference. If you like CentOS, it is a perfectly plausible solution for Linux server as it is stable and well supported in the communities. Use what you are comfortable with, that is the most important thing you need to remember. If were to build out a data center today, it would probably be all Debian, but that is because that is what I'm comfortable using.

HTH,

KaBar's Edge

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Pulling this thread back on topic before it becomes a distro x vs y thread :p the real answer is that the question is a bit broad.

So far as a distro goes, you want to choose a stable one. This means realistically you're looking at Debian Stable, CentOS, Ubuntu Server or Red Hat if your happy to pay for the obligatory support license.

If you like to live on the cutting edge and can live with things breaking now and again then look at options such as Fedora, Debian Testing or Sid, Arch or Gentoo

The above choice is a trade off between having say the latest version of php or not, and personal preference in terms of layout and tools (eg yum or apt-get)

Now you have your OS sorted you can worry about servers. Apache is probably the most popular webserver around, though if you are tight on resources you should have a look at lighttpd.

If you need a database server mysql is generally the standard in my experience however postgesql is another option.

Sendmail is the obvious choice for your mta and most scripting languages have decent modules to help manage it.

Hope that all helps

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